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tv   Capitol Hill Hearings  CSPAN  September 25, 2013 8:00pm-1:01am EDT

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export of arms, we actually enforce them. people can and regularly do go to jail for breaking those laws. now the arms trade treaty will not improve systems in other countries, which in many cases actually have no system at all. there's a lot more to running an effective arms export control system than simply signing a piece of paper and using your signature to express something that's not truly in your heart. there's so much vagueness with this arms trade treaty. our regulations describing what we control are the most sophisticated in the world. it is really extremely difficult to evade them with word games. we mean what we say and we say what we mean. it's just integrity. simple. the arms trade treaty by contrast is so vague it offers many opportunities for neighs to claim they are complying with the treaty while realy carrying on as normal.
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we have a regular system for actually making decisions about what we will export and to whom we will export them. this system takes many things into account. but it is fundamentally based on upholding the united states national interest. it is not controlled by exporters, unlike in europe where exporter interests actually dominate their policies. this arms trade treaty will do nothing to change that, but it will give exporter-dominated nations a shield to hide behind. now, every nation state can control the arms trade if it's truly willing to do so. and the united states is ready to help. but few have meaningful laws about the arms trade and even fewer make any attempt to enforce them. the united states has two major programs to help serious countries. the first, the export control and related border security assistance, and it goes by the rm ecbs, is run by the state
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department. the second is h.m.a., which includes stockpile conventional munitions assistance, intended to assist in the disposal, demilitarization, security and management of explosive stockpiles. which is run by the department of defense. now, according to the state department, the u.s. has contributed over $2 billion to reduce the harmful effects of illicit, indiscriminantly used conventional weapons through conventional weapons destruction program which includes the h.m.a. in other words, the united states actually backs its words with money. and investment. and we have made that attempt throughout the whole world. listen, our arms export control system is the gold standard of the world. we are not agreed with our gold. we are willing to share our practical knowledge with nation states that are serious about arms export controls. let us not fall for the fool's gold of a treaty that truly overpromises and underdelivers.
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mr. speaker, i would like to express my gratitude to the members of congress from around the country who joined me tonight in this special order, to oppose the united nations armed trade treaty and -- arms trade treaty and i would ask the citizens of the united states, please wake up. we are losing our country day by day in ways that we do not recognize, in ways that we do not know. and truly, the sacrifice that this nation has made over the years, 1.4 million of our men and women in uniform have died to preserve those personal freedoms and liberties, this is not a good day for the united states, this is a day when the united states lowered its expectations and its exceptionalism to something that does not truly protect the united states and has a dire effect on our sovereignty as a nation. i thank you and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from pennsylvania, mr. kelly, yields back. the chair would entertain a motion to adjourn. mr. kelly: so moved.
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the speaker pro tempore: the question is on the motion to adjourn. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it. the motion is adopted. accordingly the house stands adjourned until 10:00 a.m. >> lisa is a correspondent for
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the washington bureau. what happened in today's vote? any surprise there? what is next? >> hi. i think the most interesting thing out of today's vote is that there was a rare and unanimous vote from the senate. they all agreed to go ahead and move forward on this bill. usually see those round numbers in the senate. it shows there is a need eagerness for the senators to get going on this. his allted cruz had night, round-the-clock talka thon. now, the president is in this 30 hour time period. they're getting ready to vote on the bill. the question is whether all the senators will hold firm and have
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this 30 hour debate or whether and the otheruz conservative senators fighting on this issue will yield after to speed things along. >> when they do move on, what are the changes that harry reid said he would make to the bill? >> absolutely. to get out that health care bill language in this bill. affordablefund the care act. they will be able to with a --ple majority vote district to strike that language out. republicans are fighting for that. >> about the changes that harry reid is making, it it is that he will shorten the house bill one
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month to the middle of november. what is the purpose of changing the date? senatee is a push by the democrats to do that. e appropriators more time to get some of the appropriation bills through the senate. the senate is working on their bill. there is this idea that if they wait until the last minute in december, it is not giving much time to reconcile the differences of those bills. the idea is that a shorten the continuing resolution that means the government would only be able to operate an device top measure until november. that would let if i to get some action going. -- that when light a fire to get some action going. you think might be in the senate in terms of the c.r.
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and the house leaders, what are they saying with the health care defunding language stripped out? >> absolutely. the with the calendar works, the senate would-be on track to get this bill all finished up and done with. that said, i talked to some republican leaders. they are pushing to have senator cruz and his allies yield back some of the time and wrap things up a little. is making some movement over that. he's looking to have the next ise on friday as it saturday. he wants to really capture the american public on this bill and show them what is happening. see if the senators can come to some agreement on that sometime earlier than sunday. friday night maybe. once the bill kicks over to the
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house, speaker boehner will have to see whether he will go ahead and pass the bill as it is without the health care language , which would be difficult for him because of republicans in the house disagreeing with that, or whether he will try to try one more time and take it back over to the senate for one more go at it. chambers aren both aiming for having the vote kicked over to the house and have speaker boehner attach a repeal of the medical .anufacturing device tax it is part of the health care law. the democrats have supported that in the past. they are also talking about a
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repeal of the individual mandate that requires all americans have health insurance. kickingblicans are around the idea to have speaker boehner attach to the bill and take it over to the senate warmer time. republicans in the senate carry on their fight. the less time speaker boehner has to amend the bill and send it back. said, october 1 is the deadline. they are really up to the 11th hour here. it is a matter of hours to wrap this up. mascaro works for the washington bureau. you can follow her on twitter. thank you for the update. >> thank you. span, we bring public affairs from washington directly to you, putting you in the room
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at congressional hearings, white house events, re-things, and offering complete gavel coverage of the u.s. house, all as a public service of at the industry. c-span, created by the cable tv industry and ended by your local cable or satellite providers. you can watch us in hd. as a prospect of the government shutdown on october effortsarney discussed to get a temporary spending bill passed before then. at his daily briefing, they discuss the next budget deadline and that debt ceiling. >> there are conversations between president obama and speaker boehner and leader pelosi. conversations with people in congress or the staff?
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fairlye have been consistent communications at various levels here at the white house. i do not have any specific conversations to read out. the chief of staff is going up to the hill at some point to talk with democrats. those conversations will continue. i do not have any meeting or conversation involving the resident at this time. as i think we have seen of late, there's a lot of that to the going on. every flex the divisions within their republican party. to makes is on the need wise decision and ensure the government does not shut down. we want to ensure that the u.s. does not default for the first time in its history. >> will the president still
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travel to asia? >> i have no scheduling updates. yes? engages one thing not to speaker boehner when it comes to the possibility of a shut down. we're looking at reaching the debt ceiling. thing. is the i do not have the quotes in front of me. i know you all remember it was a speaker of the house who declare that he would never negotiate with the president again. that is a little extreme. he has of course since then. the president has had conversations with him. he enjoys it as he always does. there is no negotiating over congress's responsibility to ensure we do not default. we saw what happened when that path was traveled. the result was terrible.
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even a flirtation with fault -- default. default asilling to a matter of ideology and were willing to inflict that harm on the economy and are middle-class families. the economy back to badly. markets reacted badly. people suffered. >> you know the perspective on that. >> that is the point i am making. be acannot and should not matter of negotiation. we can and should debate our differences and negotiate and reach compromises over our budget priorities. absolutely. the americane economy and the global economy and the american middle class held hostage to an insistence by a faction of congress, especially in one house.
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at the ballot box or when the legislative process played out three years ago, or in front of thesupreme court and supreme court declared the affordable care act was constitutional, it is incredibly irresponsible. the irony of ironies is when we talk about the debt ceiling. it was one preposition on the table that the public can suggest is that they would areaten default over provision that would delay implementation of the affordable care act. if that were cured out, it would add to the deficit. of the republican party is to not be further irresponsible. they have put forward a proposal that is wrong on so many fronts.
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it would increase the deficit along with it. >> it seems hard to believe the president would be able to breach the debt ceiling without needing house republicans. >> congress has the power of the purse strings. >> without having to engage them? the president has not stepped in to engage them. >> again, the president has been and continues to negotiate with republicans over our budget priorities and how to make the right choices and make compromises along the way. make sure we grow our economy and create jobs for the middle class. bring down our deficit further in the middle and out years. we have been through a process this year at the insistence of
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the republicans as part the last budget deal, the senate led by democrats passed a budget. that is what republicans insisted had to be done. you covered the hill. you heard that cry. refuse to pass a budget. the senate passed a budget. the house passed its budget, the ryan budget. 2.0. what happens then in regular order is that the two houses try to reach an agreement, a compromise. republicans in the house were so opposed to the idea of compromise, the idea of negotiation, finding common ground that they have refused to in a processrees that they said was essential. the president has demonstrated again and again his willingness to be reasonable and find common ground. when it comes to the debt ceiling, everyone says we ought
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to raise it. we can default. it would be wildly irresponsible . congress should just raise it. will letis saying we the economy default unless we get what we want, which is essentially defunding or delaying obamacare. i think it is pretty clear and a lot of republicans seem to agree that it is an irresponsible position. >> house democratic leaders talked about efforts to raise the debt ceiling to avoid a default on the national debt. house republicans say there will be a bill that would include language of implementation of the law. this is an hour. >> today it is a pleasure to join our colleagues and mr. hoyer, are distinguished w hip, and our champion on this , congressman peter welsh.
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it getting nearly every democrat to send this letter in a matter of days is quite a remarkable accomplishment. our economic and fiscal .hallenges in a balanced way consumers who are definitely affect the -- affected by a default on the lifting of the debt ceiling. republicans keep threatening a -- a shut down.
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now republicans continue to hold the full faith and credit of the united states government hostage for the radical agenda. made it secretary lu clear that the debt limit will be reached on october 17. treasury secretary lew made it clear that the debt ceiling limit would be reached on october 17. for the first time in our history. refusing to raise the debt limit poses a cataclysmic danger to the stability of our markets and economic security of our middle class. we have talked about this before. every day americans will be
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paying higher interest rates on credit cards, mortgage payments, car payments, student loans, and for small businesses, is just rates on their loans. -- and interest rates on their loans. 401k. chaos in the markets would jeopardize the war one k accounts, tensions, and other retirement plans -- jeopardize accounts, tensions, and other retirement plans. default in august of 2011 led to a downgrade. even a discussion of slow economic growth impacted the markets and caused consumer confidence to plummet. out --nment shut shutdown, bernanke talked about
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it. americans cannot afford it. that is why we are standing together to support a clean increase in our debt limits -- america canay pay its bill and avoid another billeting crisis to our economy. it is a time for the public is to bend in the reckless agenda and for both parties to come together and work together -- it to givefor republicans up the reckless agenda and for both come -- parties to come together were together. yield to ouro champion on getting this letter. you have no idea how difficult it is over a weekend to get so many signatures even when we are in session.
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i salute mr. welsh for his leadership and commitment to fiscal fairness in our country and the respect he commands in our caucus. mr. welsh. >> thank you. it is a delight to be here with our leaders. 186 members of of the caucus agree with president obama and president reagan that america pays its bills. said that thean debt ceiling should not be used as a political foot all. raising the debt ceiling is thingone thing and one only. honoring obligations incurred by previous congresses, democratic and republican. it is not about authorizing a penny of new spending. of the day is
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whether republicans are really serious about defaulting on america's debt for the first time in america's history? themey are, it is time for to sober up. if they are, their strategy will fail. the financial market will test the with into doing than what they should be doing now. that is to pay america's bills. i yield to mr. hoyer. >> thank you to your leadership and tenacity on this issue. they have been raising voices for years now on behalf of fiscal responsibility. taking your country hostage and damaging your country should not be an option.
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done bywhat is being our republican colleagues. any attempt to hold our debt limit hostage would be reckless. those of us who signed the letter are committed to a clean and debt limit extension to prevent a default and first all .nother downgrade of our credit that is not an easy vote. aswould be mischaracterized incurring additional debt. is fort limit extension that debt for which we have already incurred. it was shameful formrepublicans brought us to the brink in 2011. it led to the only downgrade of america's credit in history. we were downgraded one point the bill of republicans is nothing
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but a wish list of unrelated and partisan policies may no will not go anywhere. as a result, they're taking their countries credit hostage to their own small agenda. to provide certainty to the markets, we should act now rather than wait until october 17. the republicans may do that this week. they ought to do a clean debt limit extension. we ought to stop them agog in one another. ing one another. ben bernanke put it bluntly. 18, and failure to raise the debt limit could have to therious consequences
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financial markets and for the economy. one could shrug off mr. bernanke as overly concerned. wrote yesterday that the u.s. treasury bond is the benchmark of the world's financial markets. to default on that would create a global financial problem. it is just a bond rater. let me call your attention to this quote. former bush director of the office of management budget and of theof -- chairman gingrich led committee, "markets will react. there'll be repercussions that our economy does not need and does not deserve." be ant on to say it would
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dangerous and damaging process to pursue. we urge our republican colleagues to act responsible. putcountry above party -- country above party. welch put that mr. together -- thank you. it sends a message that we must prevent a catastrophic default. my good friend from south carolina. >> thank you. thank you, mr. welch, for your
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leadership on this issue that is so important, specially to working men and women in this great country of ours. back in 2011, when we had tremendous bricks mentioned party,place by the other some significant things started to happen. and simmer confidence plummeted. -- consumer confidence plummeted. in response to the shenanigans, businesses stopped hiring. led to a self- fulfilling prophecy. about talk all we want
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what may or may not happen, the everyone i have talked to on this tells me, what should have areened is mortgage rates going to skyrocket. not just how mortgages, student and the rate on student loans would skyrocket. when i think of all the things that could happen, and what we read about this, i often revert to my own experiences. night aboutng last some of our early lessons. i remember being in the third grade. i remember spelling bees.
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spelling bees,e the things that i remember more than anything else is my dad telling me that what has made this country great amount makes this country run is credit. of all you do, you keep your credit clean. he would drill that into us all the time. think about those fundamental lessons. i remember like i remember those spelling bees that one phrase because of one law was not allowed to go to high school finish college at -- after i was around a teenager. he would use the phrase all the
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time, full faith and credit. he thought that was so important. nothing more important to this great country of ours and to maintain the good faith and credit of the united states of america. with that, i yield back. colleaguesu to my leadershipch for his and amassing such a strong statement of support. thehoyer for talking about ramifications globally and mr. clyburn for what it means to individual americans. it is important for us to put this aside and never question the full faith and credit.
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it is about how jobs are created and how consumers spend. any questions question yes -- any questions? yes? >> how much are you looking for? one or $2 billion? how much of the increase in the debt limit? is there a dollar amount? >> i think republicans are looking to get this through the next election. it might be january of 2015. the reason for that is mr. boehner recognizes that
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responsibility of his actions and does not want to put his party through it a second time in election year. i think that would the and agreed-upon objective. does this feel similar, worse, better? are you more optimistic this time? how does this feel compared to the fight we went through years ago? >> it is worse. that was the first time congress went from grandstanding of the debt ceiling to confrontation. in this congress, we have had theership that had led congress into dysfunction. it led into disintegration. this year, what you see are people who believe it is in a legitimate tactic to blow up the
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country in order to achieve a goal. otherreminiscent of statements that somebody made in a different context. blow up the country in order to save it. it is wild and reckless. there is no legitimate rationale to destroy or jeopardize the full faith and credit of this country that has such consequences for students, --eowners, as mrs. businesses, in order to get their way. it was decided by the people in the last election and decided by this rancourt and by congress. decidedpretty -- it was by the supreme court by congress. this is pretty wild. can the party out of power demand -- [indiscernible]
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me speak to the issue in a broader sense. five years ago last week, all of us here were faced with a boat that was a very serious one. that was about passing the tarp bill. republican was in the white house. deficit andthe enormously. 11th, 12 to us at the hour really, and said, help. we, as democrats, went out there and said, time is of the essence. wayust work in a bipartisan in order to save our country from what was coming. we were already in deep recession. we're going to a serious financial institution meltdown
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and all that comes of that. in fact, that night, we were all gathered there. if we do not act immediately, we will not have an economy by monday. plate stepped up to the for this republican president. it was not a vote our members wanted to take. due to them as bailing out the bangs come up that we viewed it as saving our economy. he has left a bitter taste in the mouths of the american people. has left a bitter taste in the mouse of the american people. it is what we hear, but not the democrats were there to bail out his problem greater by his economic policies because it was important for our country.
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we all were there. 170 democrats. >> 65 and 95. >> never reached 100 that they promised on day one. this is a different thing. that was an emergency at the predictable in my view of the policies in place. republicans at the time did not -- they made adam smith look like a piker. not believe indo any regulation. that is how we got into where we were. when the wall came tumbling down, they do not believe in intervention. they were true to who they are. they do not believe in a public role. we were there to save the day,
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say the country. that.uldn't even be doing the full faith and credit of the u.s. is an established fact. i think the 14th amendment covers it. i would have never taken that off the table, but yes, i would be willing to say, don't mess with the debt limit. don't mess with the debt limit. whatever luxury you want afforded to make your point and get attention because it is center stage, that is a luxury we cannot afford. yes, i would say yes to that. by the way, if you go back to that five years ago, it was interesting to me. i was think of it and how close we were to the brink. of itdn't help but think last year during the presidential election when the
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republicans were saying, are you better off than you were four years ago? are have the nerve to say, you better off than you were four years ago? or years ago, almost to the day we wouldn'teaking, have an economy by monday. in terms of the private-public partnership to make our country grow -- >> i want to add one thing to that. i think it is important. at that meeting, the republic 15 or 16 or 17 around speaker pelosi's table. she was the speaker. they said the country was in deep trouble and needed immediate action. every leader, the republican leadership of the house was at that table, the republican leadership of the senate was at
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the table, the democratic leadership of both house and the thate, every leader said, is what we need to do to stabilize our country and to save our people from a depression. we will do it. -- weis an analogy delivered on our side of the aisle. .e had 142 votes you've only got 65 on the boat. we cannot pass it. -- year of only got 65 on the war. we cannot pass it. they went to our members. the difference is those who said they were for it could not deliver.
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>> mr. hoyer can handle this one, and ms. pelosi. >> she can handle any question you have. [laughter] to demonstrate it would be impossible to pass, they have yet to schedule a vote no. why do you mentioned that is? >> because i think there are at least are the responsible republicans. there are majority response both people. aisle,other side of the not only have they taken the government hostage in the c.r r ole, not only do they taken the credit of the u.s. hostage, but a minority of republicans have held hostage in responsible and
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reasonable members of their conference. that is why think we are in this position. i'm not sure if i was clear on the way steny has expressed. 65 did not get us to 218. we had to come back later. upall agreed that were put 120 and they would do 100. their 100 turned out to be 65. we had to go back to our members and have our members to step up. we got 30 more members. more democrats came on board to pass this bill. think down in south carolina,
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you can tell when a person will do what they have done. you can best tell what democrats by looking at the record. the record is clear. every time we have been asked by , we have stepped toto do what is necessary keep this country moving forward. that is the best example i know. theory isely, if your you need a majority in order to move an agenda, that is a problem that we face. majorityo not have a 90 days after it was supposed to
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be passed. they had fewer than 40 votes. an overwhelming majority voted against the violence against women act. there is an easy way for this to come to the floor that is not practice that has been in place. >> can i just say -- >> please. >> you asked me for my speculation. on the majority leader, i think to myself, we will put something on the floor host almost all the democrats will vote for it in a most all of my guys will -- i'm very reluctant to put in responsible piece of legislation on the floor because it will focus the american people on a lack of responsibility of the majority party. >> let me just say what full faith and credit means.
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when people bring the money to the bank, the bank uses the money for whatever purposes, but it is insured by the full faith and credit of the united states of america. that is part of what makes our system run. on the other hand, when people avon, they are guaranteed by the full faith and credit of the united states of america -- by a bond, they are guaranteed by the full faith and credit united states. you have confidence to put your money in the bank because of the full faith and credit of the united states of america. if that is not there, people will not buy the bonds. it'll be cataclysmic. one of the scenarios the republicans have is to pay china first. c.r.hina first is in their pay the debt, whatever we owe
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china. all things come together in a way that really is not responsible. it is beneath it in the teeth of the responsibility that we have as members of congress and the obligation we have to find common ground to get the job done. people can make whatever scrambles they want to make to showcase the issue, but not with the seriousness of taking down the full faith and credit of the u.s. was out in the field a few days ago reporting on this issue of the debt limit talks. i encountered when gentlemen who said the debt limit should be raised, but he was put off by the president refusing to negotiate. do think democrats lose by that stance from the white house saying they will not negotiate on this? want to see the congress and white house come together. >> i think the president has
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negotiated a negotiated. -- has negotiated and negotiated. have taken it to a point where there is no point in talking. we just have to act. i can understand why the gentleman might get that impression. if there is ever a president that talks about a continuing c.r., hen about the has in every way try to build bipartisan consensus. he advertises that enough. i'm happy to do that for him. he has a bigger bully pulpit than i do. us should be negotiating on the debt ceiling. it should just be listed. when it comes to the c.r., the president has negotiated.
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remember that march meeting with the president? he said, i hear what you're saying. i think you know how i approach all of this. i want to try to get a bipartisan agreement. obviously that has not come. this is a president who has been so bipartisan. that is a quality the american people like. even he has reached the end of the line when it comes to the shenanigans that the other side is putting up. what they are proposing is unworthy of the task before us in responsibility. thank you. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> c-span 3 is covering capitol hill hearings on thursday.
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elmendorf will be testifying before the house budget committee. general keith alexander and james clapper will talk about government surveillance programs. watch both hearings live on c- span 3 and c-span.org. house and the senate have each passed their own temporary spending bills. house version includes a provision that defund the affordable care act. senator patty murray criticized the house bill in a meeting. this is an hour. it is hard to get a large audience of mostly women quiet, isn't it?
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i'm happy about that though. welcome. thank you for being here. my name is elizabeth baker. i'm vice president of atlantic. welcome to washington. i also want to welcome the viewers that we have on our live stream as well as c-span. we are welcome to have a larger audience outside. women andic covers family issues and women professional issues in the pages of the magazine with articles -- on our website, there is a channel that covers a lot of these issues. i thought i would bring your attention to our latest issue, including one i thought particularly interesting as a mother of three tall my daughters homework is killing me. [laughter] this is about a father who decides to do his daughters homework.
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nighturs of homework per and sleep six and half hours. not necessarily a good thing we're doing for our teens and between's. -- tweens. we try to bring women's issues to life. this is the fourth program we have had this year so far bombing janet napolitano -- following janet napolitano. we want to shine a spotlight on the careers of some women have done really well in washington. to hear the personal stories and hear the career stores as well. we're very pleased to welcome senator patty murray as our guest who is chairman of the senate budget committee. before i invite patty up to the
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stage, i want to give a special thank you to exxon mobil. they have been partners on this program since the beginning. we came up with a get together to try to bring together a community of women leaders in washington. exxon mobil has supported the program since offset. our partner terry is vice president and is the leader of the washington office for mobile. she joined the firm in 2001. write to that, deputy assistant -- at the department of energy. a w housekeeping notes -- we encourage you to be part of the conversation. you can tweet comments. #atlanticww.
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we will also have an opportunity for q&a at the end. we are taping and live streaming. silencer cell phones please. i'm very happy to introduce senator patty murray. senator murray was born and raised in washington. a career inagined politics. she got into it as a mom. she was advocating for one of .er children she miniature to washington and was told she couldn't make a difference. she turned around and made a grassroots organization that indeed made a difference. they were able to reverse cuts. selected to the washington state senate. in 1992, she went for the u.s. senate pursues a tenured veteran
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. she was selected as a senator. she was reelected in 2004 and 2010. in addition of being the first fema senator from washington state, she serves as a chair on a committee. serving as a member of the senate credit leadership since 2007, she has established herself as an effect if leader on education, transportation, security, and veterans issues. welcome. in a ring her will be caring. she is new to the seat -- interviewing her will be ka ren. she is new to the seat. thank you for doing this. welcome.
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at has a full-time role msnbc. it is on air saturdays and sundays. career ind a long washington, in politics, working for presidential campaigns and at the white house and and in the new york senate race. she has been a commentator in the hill. again, many thanks to karen and senator patty murray. >> thank you. [applause] thought were read would start is the story about the school is one.
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one of the things that i thought was so remarkable and by wanted to start their is when you look at the hearings this year on military sexual assault, so many women there are asking questions and comparing that to that picture of anita hill being questioned by all of these men. it felt like we have come such a long way. >> it is a good place to start. >> absolutely. looking forward to hearing your thoughts and comments as well. i remember it like it was yesterday. legislator.e we were working passionately on issues i cared about. preschool education got me into politics to start with. issues around family and darting
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-- bargaining is fighting for things that ichiro. -- that i cared about. hearing about a nomination back of the nation's capital. the entire nation keyed into what was happening in d.c. i turned on my television to watch the united states senate committee interrogate this poor woman named anita hill. i kept looking at this committee. god. all men. not saying but i would say. i felt disoriented. i went to a dinner where everyone was talking about that. run for theto senate.
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i didn't hear anyone say what i am saying. [laughter] that.e from i felt passionately that you can sit home and complain about what is going on, but sometimes the only way to change it is to say, ok. i will do it. in 1992. the senate no one gave me a chance. i was out 3-1. i was kind of the quotation at the end. no one believed me. -- they felt time they needed someone who would be their voice. i came in. i came in in the year of the women. country change or the and the responsibility of being part of that. now forward to the hearings
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where every single committee has a woman on it. i can see my voice being reflected time and time again. ofhink that is a great piece progress for our country. it's one of the things that has changed our country. >> one thing that is notable is not only that we have 20 women senators but women senators in positions of our. power. >> you have to be here and work your way up the ranks. we have been here long enough to do that. diane feinstein is chair of the intelligence committee. people always say women's issues.
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intelligence, agriculture. the it boxer with department of environmental works. but wenot just a voice, are a player, making sure the passions we care about, the priorities we care about, the voice we care about is from the legislation. >> we are going to talk a little bit about the drama. everybody has got to have their moment. -- senatorl a brand rand is aand -- gilliba friend of mine. sometimes we need to get away from the testosterone and get something done. i wonder if you can talk about how women's leadership has changed the weight wings are
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working. -- has changed a way things are working. >> we all felt the weight of not forgood job, ourselves, but for other women so they would be in politics and do our job. we found we are our best supporters and could share things. our team leader brought us for the first one, and we found this camaraderie to be able to say, where's the dry i'm trying to work on this legislation for women in rwanda, and i don't quite know
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how to do it, or i have got an issue going at home, and i need to get is done. -- get this done. we were our best supporters. we have continued the tradition for 20 years. we welcomed new women from both parties. and then talko about everything from somebody's new grandchild or where the best place to get fast food is late at night or how we can focus on the budget crisis. we have every one of those discussions. i think it has been helpful for our goal still remains the same. if we can help each other be successful, other women will be able to do the job.
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>> there is a lot of talk. backyou hear stories from in the day, people knew each other. there was a personal relationship, and it seems like it is the weapon carrying on that tradition. >> you find kids in your school, and you find common ground. we do the same thing. >> there is a dinner you had , which wedent obama are curious to hear about. >> it was one of my favorite because he invited 20 women to the white house to have dinner with him. were looking at the white house lawn, and we shared everything.
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we talked about finding a solution. we talked about small issues and big issues. sort of towards the end of it barbara boxer said i am looking , and i amndow thinking 100 years ago when women were fighting for the right to vote they stood out of that window and were arrested the coast they tried to get the right to vote. womenretty sure that 20 around this table would have been the 20 women protesting. it remind us of what we get so frustrated with the political that a lot of progress has been made.
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our country has changed in a lot of ways. we are a country with great change, and we need to embrace that. drama on theit of hill. and a non-filibuster to slow down this process, maybe you can tell us where we go from here. he uses the time available, and that's fine. here's where we are. we all know that finding a solution to our nation's budget was probably the top priority for all of us right now.
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we go without having any .ontinuity we wrote our budget last march, passed it in the senate, and normally you would go to a conference committee and work out the differences. surprisingly, the minute we did, .hey objected everyone is going to be upset,
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and we will do something that keeps us running. here we are. it really is unfortunate. democrats and republicans have got to sit down at the same table and give. that has to be done, and our nation deserves that. >> it strikes me that over the summer we saw this old up, and we had some are republicans -- had somedup, and we republicans saying it was never going to happen. now we seem to be at the testosterone filled movement, and it will go back to the house, and there is a ping-pong , buten house and senate you are already hearing about
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house members having a list of demands for increasing the debt ceiling. us outthat going to get of this crisis to crisis zone? we are talking about a continuing resolution. we aren't even talking about a budget. >> the house passes a bill that is completely unacceptable. we're not going to take away the progress we we have made for providing health care in the country. we are going to take it in the as ae. it will be sent resolution. i think it's important to remember that we are talking about the government while we keep this issue. this is how we manage ourselves. they decided to make a temper tantrum about that. that's where we are.
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the debt ceiling, what are we going to do? i cannot believe the republicans would use the debt ceiling to throw our country into economic turmoil when we know we are just getting to feel stable again, when we are all beginning to feel we can go to work and not get a pink slip, that wall street is not going to collapse, and they are going to throw the country into turmoil? i cannot believe they are going to do that. do iftional thing to there were a group of women in charges we would keep the government running for the next would say,ks, and we we are going to pay our bills, and let's do what we have to do and pay our debts.
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that will take the leaders of both parties coming together and giving. which is how democracy works. >> who are the leaders on the republican side who can make that happen? we have seen a lot of frustration with john boehner's ability to negotiate. seem mitch mcconnell has been less willing to be out there because he is worried he is being primary back in his home state of kentucky. .e have all these who do we negotiate with? >> i think the republican -- the republicans are being controlled more by the tea party part of their group. they really don't want our democracy to function the way it is. harry reid uses the word
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anarchy. i don't know if i would go that far, but they came here to vote no. how do you function? that is what speaker boehner is dealing with. you're right? who do we -- you're right. who do we bargain with? more republicans are saying to me they feel strongly their party has to stand up to that faction, and i agree. i am a democrat. i want democrats to be in the majority, but in order to be a good country, we need a republican party who can , and we don't us have that functioning right now, but i predict we will have a
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better republican party. >> so by midnight on sunday. >> you're going to get a continued resolution. i cannot imagine the republicans want the face of their party to be that they cannot come to an agreement on small things. i cannot believe that even with the faction that is hard to deal with a would want that for republicans. seen this idea that perhaps they will try to shift and getersation something done there but then really focus on the debt ceiling and the list of demands and other things they are going to but shutting down
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the government is horrible. limit is a very serious threat. >> i think they are making a mistake if they are saying to the american public that they are going to put our entire order to getsk in their projects, even if i agree with some of them. think about the precedent that sets for the rest of our lives. every time someone is in the majority or the minority they use the debt ceiling or the economy to get what they want? we cannot run the economy that way. it's one thing if you have defenses about women's right to choose or differences about how much funding should the for education, but to put our entire economy at risk when we are at the global marketplace where other countries are competing for the same thing we are and we look like a third world country
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that cannot manage itself, i think that's very dangerous. >> does it take leadership from the president to make that happen? >> the president is clear he will not negotiate over the debt ceiling. up if he iswe end not willing to negotiate and they aren't willing to budge? >> they are apparently working on christmas tree filled demands to raise the debt ceiling. get haven't been able to the vote for everything they said they wanted either. what they are saying is i know you will never vote for the debt ceiling, but if i put in a pipeline, will you vote for it? let's wait and see what they get together.
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we will send it back clean because that is the responsible thing to do. they are going to have to live with their willingness to throw back to the-- i go 1990's, when newt gingrich shut the government down. a plane to go home, and people said, what are you doing here? in my office and answered the phone to people in tears who were not going to get their social security check. they were not able to pay their rent. if the republicans take us off that cliff and companies lay off people and folks are not getting their social security check, they are going to sit there very long. i don't think they're very smart to put us in that place. they are going to sit there very long. >> what about the business
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community. it strikes me that the shutdown -- in the clinton white house it was -- i was nonessential. it strikes me that part of the something everybody could understand, but the debt ceiling, for a lot of folks in ohio and pennsylvania, it's a harder conversation and an easier message from the republican side to say we are standing on our principles, and we aren't going to raise the debt ceiling. i think businesses in america are really concerned house republicans would but our economy into a crisis. of all, many of them do business overseas.
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they lose out because someone says your debt is no longer good or we don't trust you, they are going to lose out to other countries. their business overnight can be flipped by this economic policy. i think businesses are putting a lot of rusher on republicans. -- a lot of pressure on republicans. they put themselves in a real bind, so they have to figure out how to get through that. i would hope the business community stands up. the last time we talked about not raising credit wasiling, our downgraded. >> there is a list of other stuff that needs to be done. we have got syria.
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there are so many other issues. how do we get through this and focus on those issues? >> everybody here knows the way you get to a budget agreement is that we sit down and hammer it out. i am going to have to say, i will take that back to my caucus it.get the vote on the republicans have to say the same on their side. i will tell you the 12 people on the supercommittee were really good people, and we spent a lot of time walking through details and talking about what we could put on the table. i had the ability to say i can't bring my caucus with me. didn't have was the republican chair who could say the same thing.
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he had to go back to boehner, who went back to the tea party. we need the people in the room who are willing to stand up and be the leaders on the democratic and republican side, to say i am going to make the best eli can for my party, and then i am going to take it back and sell it because that's what our party needs. >> let's talk about the other issues. settlementwe get a by midnight on monday. talk about veterans affairs. there has been a lot about the backlog issue, a lot about concern for mental health. with theraised again navy yard. talk about that.
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>> my own father was a veteran. he was injured. seven kids in my family and my mom didn't know the extent of his injuries and what he went through, only that he was a veteran. college, itn happened to be during the vietnam war, and most of my friends were protesting. get through to school, but i was in my senior year and had to pick somewhere to do my internship. i chose the veterans hospital to do it. to theking an elevator seventh floor, going on to a men andard to work with women my age suffering from
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posttraumatic stress disorder, although that word was not used at the time. this to me was really vivid. i am dealing with these young men and women dealing with mental health aspects of serving our country. i just remember thinking, somebody has to be a voice for never knowing later i would be elected to the united states senate and be there when we have thousands of men and women coming home serving not just one term but 4, 5, and six times with the health -- with mental health issues and being in a position to fight for them. help.untry wants to it's unlike the vietnam war.
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i think our country respect these people. i think our country feels that way today. to stand up and provide services, but often the stigma of mental health -- you have to be the warrior saying you have andlenges -- is not easy, critically, it is fighting the whoure of our military don't want to accept that mental we have to challenge deal with, so changing the culture of the military, changing the culture of us as a country, not saying i feel bad but i'm not the, going to hire you. that's a bad attitude. problem to have
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the services available and to have us of the country doing everything we can, not just saying thanks but really being there. >> it strikes me that the affordable care act is a place we could change the conversation given that it would provide services and treating it like any other illness. that could be a place where you have republicans fighting against the affordable care act, talking about the need to address mental health issues not just for our veterans that when you are looking at things like gun violence. >> mental health the person help.lves have to ask for but there is somebody to answer the call when somebody asked for help.
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this young man was not silent about it. the question we have to ask is did we give him the right things? >> do you think we are making progress on military sexual assault? >> i want that to be better. we stood up and held a three- star general. think what's great is we have women in the senate who are not going to say, it's taken care of. i think the military recognizes it, and the military recognizes they need people to come into the military. i don't want my son or daughter serving in the
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military, we aren't going to be a strong country. the military has to change. this is not a topic where we say ok, we took care of that. >> in terms of the issue of do these get handled in the chain of command, what resources are available outside of the chain of command. where do we end up? >> the good he is we are actually about the solution. having a really good debate about that. we will figure that out, but the good news is we are having a debate about that. have a debate 20 years ago.
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we are saying it is not working. we want to get it right, and i think we will. >> we are going to take questions in a few minutes. let's switch to education. let's start with early childhood education and the president's proposals regarding headstart. where do you see that going? >> i am the only preschool teacher in the united states senator here -- united states senate. i know how important it is for our young children to have the ability to be successful, and there is a huge difference between those who have some kind of support in terms of the six feels we need as americans and
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being able to work in a group, and we have left the hind the vast majority of young kids today. manyve left behind competitors. experience,des of and every country in the world in shown we need to invest early childhood education, and we have not done it. a teacher told me 80% of her kindergartners come to school on the first day and don't know how to turn up page in a book. what were they doing? know to parents don't read to their kids, and a lot of parents do. we need to give them the skills to say, reading to your children is not just fun.
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it is important to their brain development. i am 100% behind our country really focusing on those young kids. you know who is with me on this? police chief. they tell me the vast majority of people in their jails never had early education. for me this is a no-brainer that i am passionate about. is their support on the republican side of the aisle? >> i believe there is. we are looking at the overall budget. what are the priorities? we have spent so much time talking about the deficit that we haven't talked about education. we haven't talked about transportation infrastructure.
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we also have to deal with these other deficits and get that investment. >> there is talk about increases in military spending. we know that the miniscule amount of waste, fraud, and abuse -- >> you cannot teach a child to come to class hungry. for our young people to be in the community, you have a group of 24-year- olds, and they have not had something to eat in a couple days, they aren't going to learn anything. i am mad about this. ofthere is a level
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conversation we have been having. we are talking about $40 million, and we are not talking investments in early childhood education. findo we shift and partners on the other side to make those investments happen. >> first we give them courage to take on the tea party. there were a lot of republicans who worked with us. they really understood the need for early childhood education. right now those kinds of
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republican senators are so fearful of being eliminated in a tea party primary all they think they should talk about is how they can cut back. we need to give republicans a way to work with us to lower the cost in our jails when we invest in early childhood education, to have a group that are healthy and well-educated. we need to get back to that topic. your roles has been working to recruit candidates to run in the senate. i wonder why we don't have more women running and what is the argument you make to them to have more run? wei think it is important
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repeatore policies and back to their constituents what it is. men creatingll legislation, women will turn them off. you need women explaining it as well. nordstrom's understands that. areve women and men who sales people on purpose. having diverse body is important. why is it important for women to be in politics? we bring issues to the table, but we help america understand why we are fighting for what we are fighting for. important, and it's great to see people. you i have chaired
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the democratic committee twice. you don't recruit people into politics. open the door for them. men the first thing they say is, to money have you raised? they can speak to them. i think they need to know that one enlisted to them while they speak. >> a question to the left?
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>> i want to thank your staff for their interest in looking at frome can capture savings budget processes, and i am wondering your thoughts on that and how we might move forward. >> that is a huge amount of refocusing use, from paying huge amounts for all the things that cost more. disconnect a huge when we look at it. insurance companies cover you until you are 65. insurance companies have never been interested in doing prevention for those diseases you normally spend a lot of money on after you are 65. it is somebody else's problem.
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we need to make sure the health care system focuses on prevention. it's what the affordable care act does by providing health so theyerage for people do have mammograms on a regular basis. if you have knowledge and make the decisions about yourself, then you make the decisions about yourself. if you don't have the knowledge, you are going, if i had just , orn more vegetables whatever it is. need to help people do that. a lot of businesses are looking at wellness. >> it's not just having information but having access. there isn't always this
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understanding that some people don't have the opportunity to .ake a good choice >> go back to those kids who come to school and don't know how to turn a page in a book. to,hey haven't been read have they ever had immunizations ? have they ever had simple care when they were young that helps them be healthier? probably not. workve to make sure we with those communities and provide them with the knowledge they need. parents want to do the right thing, but it is helping them get the knowledge. >> other questions? >> i work for government services.
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you mentioned several times congressman boehner and other republicans need to go back to the tea party to get permission , and ilegislation passed think it has been well the tea partyat is not a grassroots organization at all. it's basically funded by people .ike charles and david coke how does the senate stop something like the tea party from holding the rest of america hostage? to give advice to my republican counterparts, because i want to stay in the majority, but i wouldo win, say, you need to stand up to the tea party.
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people will admire that and respect that. people want their legislators to work from a point of courage, not the point of fear. that is were tea party members are winning. if you have republicans that look fearful versus a strong person who says they are going buto for it, you will lose, if you say, i disagree with you, and this is what is important, they are going to start winning. had private conversations with republicans in this town. there were so many republicans who thought what rush limbaugh said was terrible. i said, why don't you say that? they said, we cannot speak out against rush.
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similarly, you hear the conversation about tea party people. as much frustration as they have, it deems like a are -- like they are looking at their colleague. >> that's leading from the point of fear. people don't support fear. whether you are a ceo or a legislator, they need to be confident in their leaders. if you are confident in your self people will be confident in you. they need to take them on. >> i am peggy. i am a congressional report are for hispanic outlook. all sides andr all issues.
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i have met a lot of republican women. often everyone thinks the same. there are a lot of african american women who don't approve of gay marriage. peoplerried about becoming less tolerant. the press is making it hard to work with tea party people. with them?work fax she and i have introduced legislation to gather. i have a tremendous -- together. i have a tremendous amount of
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respect for her. great speaking out. she took on her own leadership. we need to reward that in america and in the press. lost.that gets >> with the democratic women, there is diversity of opinion. >> i come from a big family. we recognize i will not agree with kelly on certain issues, but we don't have to debate that all the time. let's find out what we agree with.
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i think it's important to say, we have a budget in front of us. what can we do? how we come to compromise and how we are willing to do that. i think the reward of encouraging people to do that is what we have lost and needs to come back. >> is that a function of how women lead? >> we chair the transportation committee. together.rk closely i realize there are things she needs i may not agree with, but i am willing to put that in the she so she has something
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can bring forward. we wrote the bill. we were told we would never get it out of subcommittee. i think i may be your only republican vote, and we ended up getting six or seven republican thes, and we brought it to senate floor only because mitch mcconnell thought we weren't going to pass any appropriation bills. susan and i respect each other. she respects what my values are. we know what our common ground is. we know when we disagree. we don't need to focus on our disagreement. often we are moms. we have kids. we know we cannot give them what they want always, but we listen to what we can give them. that is another trade.
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workingd experience for in the senate. i want to say thank you for all the leadership you have demonstrated for children with disabilities and our veterans. has been a joy to work with you on making sure they get what they need. from the radical position that people need health care to live independent lives. one thing we have been proud of is market reforms, no pre- existing conditions for kids. think all those things are good for the middle class and families. frustrated by 41 or 42 votes in the house. but whatthat's silly,
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are the implications of all these votes from your perspective? >> we are very clear. if we want to keep government running we are supposed to repeal the affordable care act. are there parts we can make better? of course there is. but are we going to take maternity care for women in this country and go back to a place where pre-existing condition is being pregnant and you don't get health care? a placeoing to go to where kids reach their cap by a- year-old and are denied health care? a woman was saying to me -- they were lamenting the health care bills. i didn't have to say anything. up and said, i
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have to tell you, my son is severely disabled. he has never been able to buy insurance because of that. i am getting older. i am so scared. , butld not sleep at night he can buy insurance. he is going to be ok. don't take that away. i think as more people see that we will get past the temper tantrum. they can say it didn't work. >> one more question. this woman on this site? -- side? >> i am the mother of a preschooler.
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i am really curious. antiquated ithow is. i have to go to the fields and , and over the summer inner-city kids are not getting as much food. they are falling further behind. i wonder when we are going to have a conversation about basic fundamentals. things soh art and and weve a way to learn can do our job. most of us are farmers. i wonder why we have a hard time tweaking a system that is so
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wrong. there are a lot of creative things being done to deal with that. every woman who is a professional and has a child at home has two address that. we need to allow women to choose to do both. allow women who want to stay home to stay home, and we need policies where women who want to focus on a professional life are supported by that. we want.at making sure our kids are ok is so critical for the nation. we do a better job when we know our kids are ok. when we have to pick them up at noon or we get charged twice as much, those things make a challenge to do our job. throw one thing out i am seeing happen as a result of women speaking out, and thatsue.
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it makes our stomach turn. educators group of working with daycare folks to give them curriculum so they are actually giving them curriculum that will help them be a better daycare person. i don't care if you have three kids or 20. providers are ecstatic. they are being told their job is perfect -- important, and here is how you can do it better. helping those people feel they are a critical part of our country and giving them the skills to do it is going to help in this country. there are some great skills. i wish we had done that.
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take you. we are going to close our program. [applause] >> thank you very much. we know you have a lot going it was wonderful for you to share your thoughts and experiences. a very special thanks for supporting. keep an eye on our website for news of our other upcoming programs. thanks again, and enjoy the rest of the afternoon. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute]
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[captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013]
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>> nsa director keith alexander. house democrats discuss raising the federal debt ceiling, and later patty murray. on the next "washington journal," the congressman from georgia talks about a provision then the sponsor, and representative of illinois discusses a debate over a possible government shut down. are -- goldmacher talks about what is happening on capitol hill. at 7:00ry morning eastern on c-span. >> since 1998, book tv has shown
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over 40,000 hours of programming with top nonfiction authors, including bob woodward. were going to do it after he died, but he preempted it, and i was horrified. i was delighted. >> the artist in may rose to the that if i could create something so moving that prevents the kind of distance you sometimes need then people and understand, understanding is fundamental. >> no argument is given to that effect. none of them are considered. this is regarded as a half-dozen cases where it entails the use of military force was
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legitimate. >> we are the only national television network devoted to books. we are marking 15 years. >> had it passed it would have statesed dozens of rights. they would no longer be subject discrimination, and symbolically, women would have been recognized as mothers as well as workers. irony is it was a well organized, articulate campaign of activist women who engineered to defeat. against theash onal rights amendment sunday
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american history tv. >> the director of the national security agency spoke today about media leaks and how they affect computer security. ins was part of the summit washington, d.c. this is just over an hour. >> good morning. if i could have your attention please. good morning, and welcome to the fourth annual cyber security summit. for coming. it's my honor to welcome you today. i am the producer of today's summit. for those of you not familiar, our mission has been to provide
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reforms independent with world-class experts on cyber security, and i think we could not have stronger and more today.geable -- expert we have nearly 30 other istinguished speakers, and want to thank each of the speakers for gathering today. quick wouldr five just ago announcement. first, this is off the record with two exceptions. that willis the panel be held later this morning, and our last panel is the cyber innovation panel. in all cases it is
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nonclassified. filmingc-span will be today. dr. alexander and michael daniel our keynote. that the disclaimer presentations are for informational purposes and represent their views rather than the company. we have a full day planned for you. as you can see, it is a packed day. it is a great series of presenters. be taking questions from notecards. please write the questions down, we will pick
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them when the q&a begins. thank you for your help in that regard. at the conclusion we will ask that you take a half-hour break for lunch. we have added a reception, so we hope you will stay and join us 5:30he reception from until 6:30. this has been a most active year for cybersecurity. there is a list of topics i could spend a good deal of the day discussing. you represent some of the true leaders in this field, and we engaging inl be conversation.
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the topics range to big data. without further ado, let's move to the opening keynote. for those joining us, i want to general keith alexander, as you know, is currently commander of u.s. cyber command, director of the national security agency, and chief of the central security service. servicee nsa's longest director, having held the position since 2005. in 2010, he became commander of cyber command and earned his fourth start. i'm appreciative he has taken the time out of his extremely
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busy schedule to speak to our audience here and to our c-span audience watching with us. i turn the podium to you with many thanks for agreeing to add your important perspective to timepen dialogue during a of immense challenges in the cybersecurity feel that we are trying to address today to help secure our nation. i turn the podium to you and thank you again for being with us. [applause] >> i have a four-hour speech set up. warm you for the introduction and thank you for the invitation here. surgery.e dental it is not that i was chewing tobacco. it is good to see you here. , and i use the we workedely,
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together years ago. . was set out on a course i never wanted to stay in the military. i always thought i would get out after five years. me intostein talked staying in. he probably said, maybe you stayed six months too long. [laughter] the discussion we have today is cybersecurity. , upfront, i have to talk about media leaks, not because i want to, not because i went in and had dental surgery to prepare a discussion on media leaks to root canals, but if we are going to have a serious discussion on cybersecurity, we first have to address media leaks. we have to get some of the facts
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out on the table. i think the first thing we have to have on the table is our mission is to defend this country. we can dober command it without your help -- cannot do it without your help. i want to talk to you about that. it is important we put that on the table and that we get people to talk about the facts. not to inflame it, not to sensationalize it. the future of this nation depends on our ability to protect us from terrorist attacks and cyber incidents. are the two things that can really impact the country.
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they both significantly operate on the same network. what i will do is walk to -- and then i will shift over to security. cyber we need your help and need to get the facts out. we need our nation to understand why we need these tools and what the tools mean to civil liberty and what they mean to defending the country. everyone in this room can remember 9/11. the impact it had on our country. almost 3000 people killed by terrorists. new york and has a mania and here in washington. we remember how the firemen
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tried to save lives and they themselves were killed. , and what iremember think you in this room really remember is the military picking up that flag. we will take it. we will defend the country. and they did. i am proud of that. petraeus,at date stan mcchrystal, mick raven, marty, look at what our nation was given to protect the country. they went in for iraq. they went in for afghanistan. lives were lost.
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nsa in 2005, some of the folks here are from nsa. they said, we can help here you will help. the intelligence our troops need to survive and win. .e put those folks forward over 6000 nsa employees went into iraq and afghanistan. dave petraeus said that turned iraq around. to our favor and put it where it needed to be. 22 cryptologist have lost their lives in iraq and afghanistan. they are the heroes. not the media leaker. they are the ones that pick the
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flag up for the folks in new york and he did what our nation needed them to do. but they did more. the ginsust like knife. that is a joke. [laughter] they did more. we understand our job is to defend this country. it is a noble mission. i look at the folks that do this every day and say, these are great americans. is they canve done see what the terrorist's are trying to do coming into the were blamedwhat we for as an intelligence community was not connecting the dots. one set of data, the cia, nsa, and other intelligence agencies, another. and we were blamed for not
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connecting the dots. we said, we need the ability to connect the dots. we came up with a couple of programs. business record fisa is the key you -- key to connect the dots. that is the one we need to focus on here today. what is that all about? how do we connect the dots with this? what is it? it has been sensationalized, that we are listening to americans phone calls and reading e-mails. that is flat wrong. under fisa, we would have to have an individualized warrant to do that. our job is foreign intelligence. what we do need is detailed
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records that we get into 15. we need those to connect the dots from what nsa can see to what, to get that the fbi can seek -- see here in the states. includetail records the two, the front, the duration, and the daytime call. there is no content. there are no names. just the numbers. that is it. that is all we asked for. that is what the courts gave us. 29 pagean wrote a great opinion on this. you ought to read that. what do we do with that?
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terrorist are trying to do something in this country and we can come up with a reasonable .uspicion we can then take the number, open up the box that has all the data in it and look into it. 2012, less than 300 numbers were looked at. that is it. we need to connect the dots. that will tell you, although i cannot go into detail, it provides us the speed and agility in crises like the boston marathon. and the threats this summer. what is hiked up in reporting is when we are listening in phone calls, we are reading e- mails. that is not true.
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there is a great saying. all that it takes that will be able to triumph is for good men to do nothing. we have to connect the dots. we live in a great country. we really do. we are blessed. we really are. the last week, over 950 people were killed in kenya, syria, iraq, yemen, and afghanistan. by terrorists. we are discussing more esoteric things here. because we have stopped
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terrorist attacks here. we are fortunate. it has not been luck. and ther military intelligence community back here. , cia, dia, and fbi working together with military and state and local law enforcement. they keep us safe. they cannot do without tools. so we are going to have a debate in the country. do we give up those tools? am concerned we will make a wrong decision because the facts are not on the table. you have to help us get the facts out. is,of those sets of facts what about compliance incidences? what is one and what do you mean?
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what are you doing? it sounds to me like you are out of control. i get this a lot. there are two sets of authorities we operate under. overseasit sounds, we call it ee order, 1, 2, triple three. over the last decade, we have had 12 willful violation in the area. where people, normally sitting overseas, have used the cryptologic system inappropriately. all 12 people order, 1, 2, triple three. were held accountable. most of them opted to retire or resign. two were given article 15's, reduced grade, and lost half a months pay for two months. you want to know the interesting part? most of it was against foreign
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nationals. not against american people. they did something wrong and we held them accountable. we did the right thing. it is interesting for our allies to understand this system we have and share with our allies, if we make a to stay -- a mistake, whether with a u.s. prison or foreign person, we hold ourselves accountable. we report it. i will tell you something else. is the best technical agency in the world. bar none. are saying, "what about the leaker? we trusted him and he betrayed .hat trust
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he was an i.t. administrator, responsible for moving data to a common website. he stole some of the data. we trusted him and he betrayed it. that will not happen again. we have fixed that. but that does not make him a hero, stealing our data, going to china, going to china, and doing what he has done to the country. the people who learn from this are the ones who will hurt this nation and our people. they will learn from it. the tools that were so effective over the last past decade will not be as effective in the future. 2767 is also a port -- incidences. if you think about those, what does nsa do with those
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incidences and why do we need to discuss that? we are a technical agency. the networks we are operating on are always changing an hour. -- job is to confirm we are complying with the law. , we self- a mistake report and call those incidences or violations. some people immediately jumped that to privacy violations. that is wrong. 2007 2007 hundred 76 20idences in that report, south -- 20,065 are roamers and those who came into the united states. the department of justice and the courts do not call that a violation. and endeavors that
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to always do better to get out. at least 711 over a year. the majority of those are foreign. 27 -- they are u.s. persons. those are considered typing in the number. you hopefully have passwords on the computer. do you do that again? every one of those would be a violation. here is the key for our privacy in the area. , wee do, make a mistake report it. any data we collect is purged and we have to prove that to the court. we self-report to the dni. dod. department of justice. congress.
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and to the courts. we do not step back. ,ome of these, as you have read are ones that would make you say, i would not like to have this one get out. but we will do the right thing. in every case. that is what we have done. what that means for you and the is that you are guaranteed that we will do every we can to protect your toil liberties, privacy, and defend this country. that is our job. that is what we do. as i look out, in all of this, and i think about what has gone on over the last three plus months, we have had a lot of
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--cussion but very list very little has been nested in the facts. congress is back in session. this will pick up. the american people have to weigh in and have to help us get the tools we need to defend this country and protect our civil liberties and privacy. what i can tell you is we are trying to be more transparent. it is hard for an agency that, for the last 60 years, has been invisible. now, we need to be transparent. we are working to do that. but i will tell you, when you look at what nsa has done for the country, has done with our
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armed forces, they are the noble people. they have earned your respect. they are the ones that, every weekend, for the last eight years, the ct folks have been in, working for this country every weekend for eight years since i have been there. think about that. 24 hours a day, seven days a week, they are there to defend us. they need the tools to do it. you have to help us get there. on there my thoughts media leaks, not that i feel strongly about that. [laughter] i would tell you another thing. two otheraddress portions of this. for many of you in industry,
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this is a compelled relationship from the courts to industry to provide the data we need. industry is not driving up to nsa and dumping off foreign person data to us. they are providing what the courts have directed them to provide. same is, ironically, the information other countries demand of industry in a compelled, lawful, enforcement venue. our industry folks have taken a beating and it is wrong. they are only doing what our nation is at -- has asked them. what other nations have needed from them, and what we have done together. terroristout 54 events that have been stopped. 41in the united states,
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overseas, 25 in europe. it would not have been possible without that capability. industry has done what we have asked them to do. they save lives, here, and abroad. our allies have benefited from that. many people have asked me, how has this impacted your relationship with allies. here is what i get. keep looking with us. the intelligence you get us to defend our country is what we really need. that is the fact. that is what i get. see a lot of political stuff out there. please do not stop. we need your help. you know what? we need their help to. a waye to come up with
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of working together. in all of this, there are a couple of things i would put on the table. that comment about what is -- a couple of things i am really proud of. this country stood up on syria. that is the right thing to do. 1400 people were killed in a chemical attack, or more. we stood up. now there are discussions. it would not have happened without our nation standing up. in the partnership with al ally -- our allies, it is important. one of the things the director of national intelligence and the white house and others have asked us to look at is options put on the table for how to work with allies in the future. i think that is important.
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i had to start with the media leaks. if we were going to have a serious talk on cyber security. let's shift to cybersecurity. goingou look at what is on, it is the same network, same technical still -- skills. debbie will be here after me and she told us to hike this. it is an honor and privilege to work with great people like debbie, who run information sick -- insurance director for the past five or six years. absolutely superb. they are the ones who, if you look back in our history in 1945, used and created cicada, our encryption capabilities not broken by the enemy while we broke -- broke enigma.
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they do that today for our country and government. they do an absolutely superb job. thank you for you do. i failedery question to answer. good luck with that. [laughter] ,ybersecurity, save networks same technical skills, same legal framework. a lot going on. two things that can hurt us. terrorism and cyber. ciber is the easiest one to get at us. -- happened ins the past year. 300 service attacks on wall street. we saw the script -- to struck
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if attacks in august 2012. we have seen descriptive attacks against south korea. what that says to me is this is going to pick up. it is going to get worse. we have to get a number of things done to protect the country. about fivealk different areas that nsa and cyber command are working together that i think are important to our country and that the top priorities, i will start our -- start out with trained and ready force. the most important thing we can do is train our people. in the world. that is what the american people expect of our military and intelligence community. that is what we are doing. y echo in this area, technical skills really matter.
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they really do. n a ltiyear services to train our forces. they have trained approximately one third of the force in 2013 and one third in 2014 and 2015. a huge step forward. the service chiefs have stood up and pushed the forces forward, despite sequestration and all the battles going on in the pentagon. they have stood up and all we havehis is a threat to address as a military, for the good of our nation. we have teams that are fully operational now, working side- by-side with the nsa. have also activated a cyber national mission had orders.
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this is the one that would react to an attack on the defense department. we will ensure we have the best force anywhere in the world. you we are also conducting exercises, such as cyberguard and cyber flag that includes the combatant commands, the regard, and the reserve, and interagency participation, to techniques,tact is, and procedures, and working relationship needed for defending the nation and conducting operations in cyberspace. cyber command provides cyber support elements to every combatant command today. we aren't refining our operational concepts and commanding control. , the second part,
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coming up with the operation concepts is vital for the future. how does a force like this does an essay and cyber command work with fbi and dhs? great partnerships. a callout to both fbi and dhs. peck outgrew will be here later. absolutely superb harness. .t takes a team to do this our job is to defend the nace. -- defend the nation. the fbi is inside the country defending it. dhs is setting standards. one of the things we have to fix in the defense department, and i'm not sure if you will talk about this, but i will enter into it and hopefully i will .ot steal your thunder
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we need a defensible architecture. the legacy architecture that we have today has a number of problems. we have 15,000 enclaves. is almost impossible to see what is going on in every one of those. think of this as all the tables in the room. what somebodyow is writing in their notes and they are 10 pages over. there is no way to know. that is a good thing. but there is no way to see attacks coming in. if they get to one table, everything else is open. our architecture needs to be redefined. i think the cloud architecture that has been pushed forward the joint information environment and the intel communities i.t. environment, is where our nation needs to be.
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a thin, virtual cloud environment. it offers great capabilities for the future. patchingink about these tables. if we were just to pass cars around and we do started to patch, how long it would take should we get those cards amongst all the tables. then think about 15,000 enclaves trying to patch their networks at network speed. a series of system administrators that work for each enclave, what is the probability somebody will make a mistake? one. 100%. or, that they will be too long and the adversary will find that vulnerability and penetrate the system? the way we are set up today is not where we need to be.
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youhe thin virtual cloud, could essentially fixed the entire network within a few minutes. that out, do all the patching, all the vulnerability scanning and everything you needed, in a few minutes. be done centrally and you could remove humans in the loop and put them where they need to be in protecting the networks. there are other things you could do in this as well. by having a thin virtual system is a, each system we see being scanned by an adversary. we can write that down and put it in a new place. you can jump networks, databases, and your actual on system and make it very difficult for average terry's .o -- adversaries to exploit i think it is the wave of the future, something vitally important for our country.
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shared situational awareness is another thing we need to do. we need to address. i mean about shared situational awareness? this is something interesting. if you were asking somebody to describe the recent exploits or attack into your network, ask the i.t. people to draw you a picture. say, show me what that looks like, because i just want to understand what happened. they will talk about the main controls. it is almost like a pilot. they show you this coming in. they say, ok, it is like this and then this happened. and bad things. and we were had. it is bad. it will take weeks, months,
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years to get them out. how does it look? you say, how will we fix it? how are you going to systematically repair that and get the adversary out? it is a big problem. , and younnot see it cannot get the humans to understand it, how do you get them all on the same sheet of music to accomplish those goals? and if you widen it and say come where is the adversary coming from and how did they get into the country, what is an essay's role and how do you see that? how do allies see that how do we work together?
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the answer is, nobody sees it. today, we do not have the shared situational awareness we need. this is going to be a key capability for the future. we are developing a common operational picture. i think that is important for our nation and our defense department for cyber command for nsa. we are sharing it with dhs, fbi, cia, all the combatant commands and allies. it is a great way to go in the future. i spent a lot of time on media leaks upfront. i did that for a couple of reasons. in cybersecurity, we need to work with industry. we absolutely need to work with industry.
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industry owns and operates 85% -- of our networks. --e is the issue we have on on the table. let's say bank one is being attacked and they fire back from the point where they think the attack is coming from and they wipe out that capability. whoops. that was just a network the adversary was using. in a neutral country. they took it out. that is what they would see from there and. what that would create is a problem in physical space.
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we have problems. what we will quickly get to is this is the responsibility of our government to respond back. it is the president and secretary and their responsibility to tell us when and what we should do. have to work with industry because we cannot see it. we get right back to that. if we cannot see it, we cannot respond to it. , weattacks on wall street can tell you how they went down and how bad they were. if we cannot work with industry, if we cannot share information with them, we will not be able to stop it here and we have to do that at network speed.
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we knowto share what about threats. we have to -- they have to tell us what they see. this is where the internet service providers are critical to this. -- asst here but with allies and others. we have to come together and figure out how we will do that. it takes industry. if you think about the problems with media leaks, and the issue we have there, we have to resolve that, because industry is critical to defending our country and the partnerships is critical. their way. working i will tell you that the senate select committee on intelligence, by senator feinstein, and the cochair, and the committee on intelligence chair by congressman mike congressman dutch,
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are superb to work with in both sides of this. they stood up on the media leaks when it was not popular. pushing for cyber legislation and trying to resolve the things industry thinks they need and what our government needs for us to work together. we will have to do both. it will be critical for our country. what i would say, as we look at what is going on with media leaks, and what has happened to , as a consequence, we need to fix this. industry has done the right thing. they are doing what our nation has asked them. we need industry to work with .s our allies are a key part of it. these networks go all the way around the world. coming fromcables
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the atlantic, about two thirds of them. makes pretty good sense. if the united kingdom could clean that part, we protect this part. we have the basis of an alliance. , we oughtrk, spain to figure out how to partner with them. we are working that. i want to talk about authorities. i gave you a couple of issues we need. we need the tools to protect this country. in cybersecurity, we need authorities. we have worked with partners to find clear roles and
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responsibilities. that is between fbi, dhs, and cyber command. clear lines.ve we need to work with congress on additional legislation regarding cybersecurity and private industry. that specifically is how we will share information and how we will provide liability protection to them. we havee the key issues to come out with this. we also have to clarify rules of engagement. what is expected of us? this is a if a cult topic. we do not want nsa and cyber command doing something irresponsible. on the other hand, we do not want nsa and cyber command waiting for authorities while wall street is taken cyber. how do we work that? the-- i will tell youthis is at
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folks at u.s. cyber command are working within the defense look atnt to work -- to the authorities we need. it very closely follows what you would expect us to do, as if this were a missile attack on our country. how do we set up the conference calls? to the secretary of defense and president and get the authorities we need and tio? throughorking our way that. the government has done a great job moving that forward. there will be more we need and that is legislation. to sum up on the cybersecurity side, no single public or private entity has all the , resources,wledge authorities, or capabilities. we have to work together.
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i think we have to do that between government and industry and with our allies. we have to address these issues as a team. so, i want to -- i'm going to stop, i know the clock is counting down here. i want to just address a couple things to summarize where we are. we talk about a team. this is a great country that we have. it really is. look at, you know, i have 15 grandchildren. and we were talking about that with bill and the folks here. you know, and one of the 1-year-old got an ipad, she was almost 2, but to show you that girls are getting faster than the boys here. she grabbed one of the ipads, she could grab that ipad, go to a netflix thing and pull up the cartoon. and she can't hardly talk but she can do that on the ipad. it's amazing. look at where these children will be in the future and the capabilities.
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look at what industry has done in this area. it is absolutely superb. it would not have been possible if we didn't have the military and the intelligence community protecting this nation. 950 people were killed over the last week and look at our country. look at what we enjoy. and it's not by accident. it's by a lot of hard work, people behind the scenes that are doing what our nation expects them to do. they do it because it's the right thing. they do it as part of a team.
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that military and intelligence team that defends this country, it is the greatest honor and privilege i have ever had to serve with them. because they're doing what the country needs them to do. it is phenomenal to see some of these young folks come in, know they have stopped a terrorist attack and they can't tell anybody. other than us. and you know what they say? that's good enough. we save lives and people over there will never know that they were at risk. we got to partner with the f.b.i., the greatest law enforcement agency in the world, and they stopped something and american people will never know how bad it could have been. think about what happened in 2009. the new york city subway. both of those authorities were used to help stop that. those people are now in prison. team america did it. great partnership, just what you would expect.
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now, here's the deal. we need tools to do that. both in the media side and our counterterrorism and in our cybersecurity. we can't do that without your help. that's what our nation needs. that's my ask of you. you are the american people. you know, there's a lot of people out there screaming and yelling. we're not listening to their phone calls, we're not reading their email. we're defending this country. we'll do it right. we'll hold ourselves accountable. we'll reorp -- report every incident. but we need tools to protect this nation. if you take those away, think about the last week and what will happen in the future.
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my concern is if you think it's bad now, we get some of those things that happened in nairobi in this country and we have a whole different ballgame. and we will have failed. the only thing for evil to triumph is for good men to do nothing. and good men can't act without intelligence. we need that information. and we need your help in doing that. so, with that let me open it up to questions. those are things to gain information. bad now, we get some of those things that happened in nairobi in this country and we have a whole different ballgame. and we will have failed. >> thank you very much. if i could please ask you to address your questions on cards and please raise your hand. we will pick up the notecards and please, please do address them and i just would like to make a quick announcement. as the questions arise, if i might.
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just want to thank those who made today's event possible. the lunch sponsor, our diamond sponsors, r.s.a., rating on, guidance software, hewlett-packard, general dynamics, and others. our exhibiters, information security solutions, net i.q., air patrol and ieee. and we also have our media sponsors, homeland security day, cfsi and set aside alert and thank you for allowing me that opportunity to thank those who made today's event possible. questions, please do raise your hands. and i would welcome them. do you have one here? >> so before we get the questions you might have thought i was a little emotional on the media leaks part.
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actually i went in for dental surgery and it's just the pain. i really did have the dental surgery. but i do feel strongly about this country and what we ought to be doing for it. >> and it's very good do and thank you for all you're doing to secure our country. we're honored. first question regards the area of spear fishing. spear fishing poses a threat and with cybersecurity awareness starting in a week, what advice would you give executives in the room to mitigate the spear fischer threat?
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>> what's pernicious? just kidding. i'd keep those pernicions out of here. spear fishing. most of this is somebody's got your credentials, right? you've got to come up with a way of defending on the perimeter, understand how the spear fishing is going to get in. this is where they've put something in an email and they send it to you. if you get an email and you click on the attachment and it's saying, hey, i've got $1 million for you and you click on it. there ought to be something that jumps up on your screep that says you're an idiot for doing that. [laughter] now, here's what, you know, just to show you the sense of humor our folks have. they do that on mine, every time i click on that, they stop it and just put on there, you're an idiot, don't do that. but you'd be surprised at how often that works. now, the interesting part is it's not always, hey, i've got $1 million, would you just reach out and i'll help and i'll share it with you.
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often times it will be things like medical care. a change in the medical care program for your agency or your company. and they send it and it looks very real because they've done the research. and so you do have to be careful of what you click on. because once that happens, the payload or the capability that the adversaries created has dropped down on your system and once that happens they're in. so you've got to have a way of protecting your system. part of that is by setting up in your defenses and not letting attachments through or sterilizing those detachments and many of the antivirus communities already do that and they provide great capability. next question. no more? oh, good. >> we have a question on where the small business community -- for those small businesses that
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represent the innovation and much of the innovation and the growth in our economy, and -- but those companies often don't have the resources of a large company. what would you suggest to small businesses, particularly in our c-span audience who might be listening today? >> well, that's a great question. i can remember this with bill akins. i gave him the set of cards, he was one of my bosses once and he would always grab the notecards and say, i don't need to read them ahead of time, i'll read them on the stage. on the third page i wrote out, you're on your own. so he reads the first two pages, he gets to the third one, it goes, you're on your own, he looks up and goes, now what? for small businesses, you're not on your own. i think there are some great capabilities. in fact, i know debby's going to hit on part of this. one of the great things that these agencies and other governments working together, with the information insurance directorate, has come up with, the sand institute on the top 20 things you should do to protect your networks. version 4.1, is that right? version 4.1 of the sands institute has the top 20 things that you should do to protect your network. if you do that, your network go going to be pretty darn secure. it's going to be tough for
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someone to get to. if you're a small business, that's all publicly available information. i would just reach out, get that. if you're i.t. people -- your i.t. people, your information intelligent noling people, don't understand that, they can reach out to players. there are great folks at sands institute. there's great folks at d. shmplet and n.s.a.'s information insurance. we have a public website on that. you can grab that from that website. it's all free. and it's created by -- just follow that. if you do the top five you hit most of the key issues that we
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have. and i don't know, are you going to cover some of that, debby? >> [inaudible] [laughter] >> thank you. question regards the information sharing area. what is the -- regarding information sharing -- what rules of engagement do you find are necessary in that? >> well, let me talk about information sharing and i'll expand on your question a little bit. what do we need to do between government and industry to share information? and what's the kind of information that we're talking about sharing? we're not talking about sharing our privacy information. we're talking about sharing vulnerabilities and threat information. so it has nothing to do with civil liberties and private and -- privacy and everything to do with protecting our systems. so think about the great companies like mcafee, is a man tech and others that have all these antivirus capabilities. all this malware that they've detected. well, the government has some too. we have a few good people, more
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than a few, that have great technical skills, that know classified information about what our adversaries could do to this country. how do we share that classified information with industry? so here's my thought, here's our thoughts on that. if you look at the networks of this nation, they ride over the internet and the internet service providers are the ones that provide the basic help for this country. so, they're the key point of defense. at&t, verizon, sprint, l-3, centurylink, those are the companies that own and operate the underlying networks of this nation. so how do we share with them and
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they help protect? what's the relationship there? and the interest, we've got to share it with them and other companies and to to lengthly -- potentially other countries and and provide that information that says, when i see this, i'm going to tell n.s.a., cybercommand, d.h.s. and f.b.i. we got a problem and do it at network speed. so they can react. they can also call out and say, we need help here, or i see this new interesting thing, piece of malwear over here, and share that. in the information sharing environment, they -- we need the authority for them to share with us and for us to share with them . parts often times can be classified so we need a way of protecting it. and when we give them something to protect the networks, and we make a mistake, they shouldn't be held liable for it so we need the liability protection. so we need that way of information sharing for the country. next question. >> we have two questions regarding the cloud. the first one is, how do you balance the advantages of centralized architecture such as cloud computing with the risk of having all of your security eggs, as the question says, in one basket?
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>> that's a great question. and there's a couple of issues that we need to put out here on the cloud vs. the legacy architecture. there is an assumption that having all your stuff diversified in 15,000 enclaves is more defensible but that's just the opposite. in this case, i'm not talking about putting everything in one bank, but the cloud is in itself a distributed architecture that we would expect. now, there are some things that
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we need for this country to defend ourselves in cyber. to defend you in cyber. everybody in this room has either an iphone, an android or some mobile device on them today. what does that communicate with and how do we protect it? think about that. that's step one. where's the cloud in this? and what can we do in the cloud that ensures the protection of mobile environment and the cloud environment? and there are things that we can do in the cloud that we can't in our legacy architecture. specifically we can encrypt data sets, we can come up with ways of acknowledging who you are, having a secure set of encryption that sees where we are today. we can identify when actors are trying to steal data in realtime. media leaks would have been stopped by that capability. these are great attributes. and you can encrypt it. so when somebody steals it, all they get is encrypted ones and zeros. this is a great thing forward where we need to go. and there's going to be a lot that's going to go on in this area. i think it's the future and it's something that we have to embrace and figure out how we match that cloud environment with the mobile environment.
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because that's where we're all going to be operating. and i think what's coming out of there is exciting and good for our country. and as part of that future architecture that the defense department and the intel community are doing it and i'll tell you one thing, n.s.a. has developed a secure cloud called the cumulog. i'm not selling it, it's free. you can get it yourself. it's openware. and it's got a security layer and a real-time tipping and queuing capability and it's free. >> thank you very much. i know you're under a tight schedule so i'll limit it to two more questions. the first regards what specific actions can and will meet -- will most likely be taken to avoid future media leaks? i know you've mentioned and i might elaborate the systems administrators and particularly
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the two opinion person rule and the obstacle that might be posed by removal of the media. so if you could just take a shot at that question. >> well, there's a number of things and you hit a couple of those right there. first, a removal of -- removable media. two-person rule on this. system administrators need removeble media to boot systems and stuff. so we have to now put in a two-person and a have implemented a two-person rule, even for system administrators. but there's more that goes on here. when you red-team it you say, well, if you fix the removable media, all they need to do is go into the server room and take a disk. so you need to put a two-person rule on the server room, so we've done that. there's a lot that's going to have to be done. because one person has betrayed our trust and confidence. that's the right thing to do, let's go fix that. our technology direct rate have
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done a -- direct rate have done a phenomenal job -- directorate have done a phenomenal job in securing our network and we shared that across the intelligence community and the defense department and with other agencies. and i think those are steps to the future. and they've created some new tools. to watch what people do on the network, to ensure that nobody does what this leaker did again. and i think that's great work and again that's all going to be shared with our partners out there. >> thank you. the last question regards our critical infrastructure. to protect our country's most critical infrastructure from destructive cyberattacks, what authority do you feel u.s. cybercom, the n.s.a. and/or the private sector needs that they might not have now? >> i think the most important thing that we need is we need the ability to share information with industry.
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right now we can't see what's hitting industry. we have no realtime tipping and queuing capability between industry and the government. and i don't say that that has to come uniquely to cybercommand and the n.s.a. i agree that if we do this in a transparent process, send it to the government all at once, d.h.s., f.b.i., n.s.a. and cybercommand, that way everybody will know we're doing the right thing, it's transparent, and we get that information at network speed. f.b.i. can look at it to see if it's law enforcement, criminal-related. n.s.a. can look at it to see if there's a foreign nexus and cybercommand can look at it and say, what do i have to do to defend the country given this information? but you have to know the information.
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and right now what happens is the attack goes on and we're brought in after the fact. i can guarantee you, 100% of the time, we cannot stop an attack after the fact. those are quoteble quotes. [laughter] ok, so after all we're going to do is forensics. we can come in and say, it was really bad, and you can agree with us and say, yeah, it was really bad. you're probably going to have to do your whole network. yep. it's going to be a long time. yep. it's going to cost a lot of money. wish we had something up front to stop this. maybe information sharing. so that legislation that we're pushing for is absolutely important for our country. so, just to summarize if i could, thanks for taking the time to listen. there's the one ask i have of all of you and that's help us get the tools that we need to defend this country and protect our civil liberties and privacy. we'll do our part, we'll hold ourselves accountable. we'll protect civil liberties
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and privacy and we'll defend this nation and we will do it right. thank you, folks. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> we're honored that you joined us today and thank you very much for all you're doing to secure our country and i think the standing ovation speaks for itself. so thank you again, sir. >> thank you. >> i'd like to now ask our next panel to come to the stage. they'll address a good segue on the area of critical infrastructure. the stage is yours. >> c-span3 is covering capital
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hearing this. elmendorf with the long- term budget outlook. he will testify before the house budget committee. then james clapper and nsa director keith alexander testifying at the senate intelligence committee about government surveillance programs. watch both on c-span3 and c- span.org. >> originally, this was two houses. they were joined together.
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the downstairs was used as retail space. the upstairs was the home of the bowling. >> this is the bedroom of her parents. she was the seventh of 11 children. born to the bowling's preachy was one of -- she was one of over 20 family members that lived upstairs. porch. the back sleeping she would get up with her family were they would enjoy evenings together. her parents at her away from this older gentleman who was wishing to court her. there she met and married her first husband, and it really changed her life. >> watch our program on the wives of president woodrow wilson. you can see it saturday on c- span at 7 p.m. eastern. we continue our series alive on monday with first lady lawrence harding.
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>> with the prospect of a government shutdown, jay carney discussed the efforts to get a temporary spending bill passed before them. he also discussed the next budget deadline and raising the federal debt ceiling. >> have any white house officials had conversations with people in congress? >> certainly. in fairly consistent communication with congress at different levels. i don't have any specific conversations for you. the chief of staff is going out to the hill at some point to talk with democrats. those conversation will continue. i don't have any meeting or
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conversations involving the president at this time. as i think we have seen of late, there is a lot of activity going on. it reflects an norma's divisions with their public and party. it is hard for us to influence. our focus is of course on the need to make wise decisions to ensure the government doesn't shut down. especially to ensure that the united states does not default for the first amended history. >> will the president still travel to asia? >> i have no scheduling updates on the books. we intend to go. is onethink you -- it thing not to engage speaker boehner when it comes to the possibility of a government shutdown but when you are looking at reaching the debt ceiling, aren't you force to negotiate? >> here is the thing.
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don't have the quotes in front of me but i know you are member that it was the speaker of the house that said he would never negotiate with the president again. which seemed extreme. then hadnce conversations with them. he has enjoyed them as he always does. there is no negotiating over congress to ensure we do not default. when thatt happens path was traveled in 2011. the result was terrible. even the flirtation with default, when it became apparent they were members of congress who were willing to default as a matter of purity, and were willing to inflict that harm on reactedomy, the economy badly. markets reacted badly.
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>> unitive perspective and still negotiated. >> that is the point i am making. be acannot and should not matter of negotiation. we can and should debate our differences and negotiate. absolutely. but we cannot have the american economy and the global economy held hostage to an insistence by a faction of congress in one house that it achieve its political objectives. or in front of the supreme court. think about it. the irony is that when we talk about the debt ceiling, one
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proposition on the table republicans have suggested is that they would threaten default over a provision that would delay implementation of the affordable care act. out, itwere carried would add significantly to the deficit. we have seen is the occupation of the republican party in these matters. they now put forward proposition wrong on so many fronts. >> it seems hard to believe that the president of the repair to breach the debt ceiling without aving his -- >> he doesn't breach the debt ceiling. congress has the power of the pursestrings. that is the power -- that is a power proudly -- >> without having engaged them. to get to the point where there
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is a default and the president hasn't stepped in to engage them. >> again, let's be clear, the president has been and continues to be willing to negotiate with republicans over our budget priorities and how to make the right choices and make compromises along the way to make sure that we grow our economy, we create jobs for the middle class, and we bring down our deficit further in the middle and out years. has always been willing to do that. we have been through a process this year where at the insistence of the republicans, as part of the last budget deal, the senate led by democrats, passed a budget. that's what the republicans insisted had to be done. we had to follow regular order. you covered the hill, right? you have heard that cry. democrats refuse to cover -- follow regular order. they refused to pass a budget.
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the senate passed a budget. that's what the republicans wanted. the house passed its budget, the ryan budget, 2.0, and what happens then in regular order is that conferees are appointed and the two houses try to reach an agreement. compromise. republicans in the house were so opposed to the idea of compromise, the idea of negotiation, the idea of finding common ground, that to this day they have refused to appoint conferees in a process they themselves said was essential. the president has demonstrated again and again his willingness to be reasonable and find common ground. he will continue to do that. when it comes to the debt ceiling, everybodys to raise it, we can't default, would be wildly irresponsible, so we ought to -- congress should just raise it. one side is saying, we'll let the economy default unless we get what we want, which is essentially defunding or
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houseng of obamacare.>> republicans have said they will bring a bill to the floor that delays in limitation of the health care law. this is one hour. >> today is april as you to join my colleagues and our with --ished with -- whip. he has for years created -- getting every democrat to sign this letter in a matter of days is quite a remarkable accomplishment. has led the charge to address our fiscal challenges in a
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balanced way. insisted leaders has been a champion for consumers who are very definitely affected. the consumers who are greatly thected by a default on lifting of the debt ceiling. honoring the full faith and credit. the republicans threaten a government shutdown in order to put insurance companies back in charge of america's health care. now republicans continue to hold full faith and credit of the united states government hostage to their radical agenda. this morning, secretary lou made weclear the debt limbo reached on october 17. as he wrote in his letter, if we have insufficient cash on hand, it would be impossible for the
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united states of america to meet all of its obligations for the first time in our history. for the first time in our history. refusing to raise the debt limit poses a cataclysmic danger to the stability of our markets. the results would be disastrous. everyday americans would be paying higher interest rates on credit cards, mortgage payments, car payments. student loans, and for small businesses, higher interest rates on their business loans. i ask you to raise your hands who have a 401(k). jeopardize the 401(k)
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accounts. pensions and other retirement plans. 401(k) in jeopardy because of radical right-wing agendas. even talk of a default in august of 2011 led to a downgrade. even a discussion of slow economic growth impacted the markets and caused consumer confidence to plummet. a government shutdown, bernanke talked about it. americans cannot afford it. that is why we are standing together to support a clean increase in our debt limits americans can pay -- america can pay its bill and avoid another billeting crisis to our economy. it is time for republicans to
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give up the reckless agenda and for both come -- parties to come together were together. i'm pleased to yield to our champion on getting this letter. you have no idea how difficult it is over a weekend to get so many signatures even when we are in session. i salute mr. welch for his leadership and commitment to fiscal fairness in our country and the respect he commands in our caucus. mr. welch. >> thank you. it is a delight to be here with our leaders. 186 democrats, 186 members of of
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the caucus agree with president obama and president reagan that america pays its bills. president reagan said that the debt ceiling should not be used as a political foot all. raising the debt ceiling is about one thing and one thing only. honoring obligations incurred by previous congresses, democratic and republican. it is not about authorizing a penny of new spending. the question of the day is whether republicans are really serious about defaulting on america's debt for the first time in america's history? if they are, it is time for them to sober up. if they are, their strategy will fail. the financial market will test the with into doing than what they should be doing now.
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that is to pay america's bills. i yield to mr. hoyer. >> thank you to your leadership and tenacity on this issue. they have been raising voices for years now on behalf of fiscal responsibility. taking your country hostage and damaging your country should not be an option. that is what is being done by our republican colleagues. any attempt to hold our debt limit hostage would be reckless. those of us who signed the letter are committed to a clean and debt limit extension to prevent a default and first all another downgrade of our credit. that is not an easy vote. it would be mischaracterized as
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incurring additional debt. the debt limit extension is for that debt for which we have already incurred. it was shameful formrepublicans brought us to the brink in 2011. it led to the only downgrade of america's credit in history. we were downgraded one point the bill of republicans is nothing but a wish list of unrelated and partisan policies may no will not go anywhere. as a result, they're taking their countries credit hostage to their own small agenda. to provide certainty to the markets, we should act now rather than wait until october 1.
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the republicans may do that this week. they ought to do a clean debt limit extension. we ought to stop demagoging one another. ben bernanke put it bluntly. september 18, and failure to raise the debt limit could have very serious consequences to the financial markets and for the economy. one could shrug off mr. bernanke as overly concerned. moody's analyst wrote yesterday that the u.s. treasury bond is the benchmark of the world's financial markets. to default on that would create a global financial problem.
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you could say it is just a bond rater. let me call your attention to this quote. former bush director of the office of management budget and chairman of the gingrich led committee said, "markets will will react. there'll be repercussions that our economy does not need and does not deserve." he went on to say it would be a dangerous and damaging process to pursue. we urge our republican colleagues to act responsible. put country above party. the letter that mr. welch put together -- thank you. it sends a message that we must prevent a catastrophic default. my good friend from south
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carolina. >> thank you. thank you, mr. welch, for your leadership on this issue that is so important, specially to working men and women in this great country of ours. back in 2011, when we had tremendous bricks mentioned taking place by the other party,
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some significant things started to happen. and consumer confidence plummeted. in response to the shenanigans, businesses stopped hiring. that to me led to a self- fulfilling prophecy. we can talk all we want about what may or may not happen, the everyone i have talked to on this tells me, what should have happened is mortgage rates are going to skyrocket. not just how mortgages, student loans and the rate on student loans would skyrocket.
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when i think of all the things that could happen, and what we read about this, i often revert to my own experiences. i was thinking last night about some of our early lessons. i remember being in the third grade. i remember spelling bees. aside from those spelling bees, the things that i remember more than anything else is my dad telling me that what has made this country great amount makes this country run is credit. of all you do, you keep your credit clean. he would drill that into us all
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the time. think about those fundamental lessons. i remember like i remember those spelling bees that one phrase from my dad who because of one law was not allowed to go to high school finish college after i was around a teenager. he would use the phrase all the time, full faith and credit. he thought that was so important. there is nothing more important to this great country of ours and to maintain the good faith and credit of the united states of america. with that, i yield back.
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>> thank you to my colleagues and mr. welch for his leadership and amassing such a strong statement of support. mr. hoyer for talking about the ramifications globally and mr. clyburn for what it means to individual americans. it is important for us to put this aside and never question the full faith and credit. it is about how jobs are created and how consumers spend. any questions? yes?
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>> how much are you looking for? one or $2 billion? how much of the increase in the debt limit? is there a dollar amount? >> i think republicans are looking to get this through the next election. it might be january of 2015. the reason for that is mr. boehner recognizes that responsibility of his actions and does not want to put his party through it a second time in election year. i think that would the and agreed-upon objective. >> does this feel similar,
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worse, better? are you more optimistic this time? how does this feel compared to the fight we went through years ago? >> it is worse. that was the first time congress went from grandstanding of the debt ceiling to confrontation. in this congress, we have had leadership that had led the congress into dysfunction. it led into disintegration. this year, what you see are people who believe it is in a legitimate tactic to blow up the country in order to achieve a goal. it is reminiscent of other statements that somebody made in a different context. blow up the country in order to save it. it is wild and reckless. there is no legitimate rationale to destroy or jeopardize the full faith and credit of this country that has such consequences for students,
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homeowners, businesses, in order to get their way. it was decided by the people in the last election and decided by tthe supreme court by congress. this is pretty wild. >> can the party out of power demand -- [indiscernible] >> let me speak to the issue in a broader sense. five years ago last week, all of us here were faced with a boat that was a very serious one. that was about passing the tarp bill. republican was in the white house. it increase the deficit and
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enormously. they came to us at the 11th, 12 hour really, and said, help. we, as democrats, went out there and said, time is of the essence. we must work in a bipartisan way in order to save our country from what was coming. we were already in deep recession. we're going to a serious financial institution meltdown and all that comes of that. in fact, that night, we were all gathered there. if we do not act immediately, we will not have an economy by monday. so, we stepped up to the plate for this republican president. it was not a vote our members wanted to take. due to them as bailing out the bangs come up that we viewed it as saving our economy.
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it has left a bitter taste in the mouse of the american people. it is what we hear, but not the less, democrats were there to bail out his problem greater by his economic policies because it was important for our country. we all were there. 170 democrats. >> 65 and 95. >> never reached 100 that they promised on day one. this is a different thing. that was an emergency at the moment, predictable in my view of the policies in place.
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republicans at the time did not they made adam smith look like a piker. they do not believe in any regulation. that is how we got into where we were. when the wall came tumbling down, they do not believe in intervention. they were true to who they are. they do not believe in a public role. we were there to save the day, say the country. we shouldn't even be doing that. the full faith and credit of the u.s. is an established fact. i think the 14th amendment covers it. i would have never taken that off the table, but yes, i would be willing to say, don't mess
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with the debt limit. don't mess with the debt limit. whatever luxury you want afforded to make your point and get attention because it is center stage, that is a luxury we cannot afford. yes, i would say yes to that. by the way, if you go back to that five years ago, it was interesting to me. i was think of it and how close we were to the brink. i couldn't help but think of it last year during the presidential election when the republicans were saying, are you better off than you were four years ago? they have the nerve to say, are you better off than you were four years ago? or years ago, almost to the day they were speaking, we wouldn't have an economy by monday. in terms of the private-public partnership to make our country grow --
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>> i want to add one thing to that. i think it is important. at that meeting, the republic 15 or 16 or 17 around speaker pelosi's table. she was the speaker. they said the country was in deep trouble and needed immediate action. every leader, the republican leadership of the house was at that table, the republican leadership of the senate was at the table, the democratic leadership of both house and the senate, every leader said, that is what we need to do to stabilize our country and to save our people from a depression. we will do it. there is an analogy -- we delivered on our side of the aisle. we had 142 votes.
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you've only got 65 on the vote. we cannot pass it. they went to our members. the difference is those who said they were for it could not deliver. >> mr. hoyer can handle this one, and ms. pelosi. >> she can handle any question you have. [laughter] >> to demonstrate it would be impossible to pass, they have yet to schedule a vote no. why do you mentioned that is?
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>> because i think there are at least are the responsible republicans. there are majority response both people. on the other side of the aisle, not only have they taken the government hostage in the c.r role, not only do they taken the credit of the u.s. hostage, but a minority of republicans have held hostage in responsible and reasonable members of their conference. that is why think we are in this position. >> i'm not sure if i was clear on the way steny has expressed. 65 did not get us to 218. we had to come back later.
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we all agreed that were put up 120 and they would do 100. their 100 turned out to be 65. we had to go back to our members and have our members to step up. we got 30 more members. more democrats came on board to pass this bill. i think down in south carolina, you can tell when a person will do what they have done. you can best tell what democrats will do by looking at the record. the record is clear. every time we have been asked by any president, we have stepped up to do what is necessary to
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keep this country moving forward. that is the best example i know. unfortunately, if your theory is you need a majority in order to move an agenda, that is a problem that we face. >> they do not have a majority 90 days after it was supposed to be passed. they had fewer than 40 votes. an overwhelming majority voted against the violence against women act. there is an easy way for this to come to the floor that is not breaking any practice that has been in place. >> can i just say -- >> please.
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>> you asked me for my speculation. on the majority leader, i think to myself, we will put something on the floor that has almost all the democrats will vote for it and almost all of my guys will i'm very reluctant to put in responsible piece of legislation on the floor because it will focus the american people on a lack of responsibility of the majority party. >> let me just say what full faith and credit means. when people bring the money to the bank, the bank uses the money for whatever purposes, but it is insured by the full faith and credit of the united states of america. that is part of what makes our system run. on the other hand, when people
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buy a bond, they are guaranteed by the full faith and credit united states. you have confidence to put your money in the bank because of the full faith and credit of the united states of america. if that is not there, people will not buy the bonds. it'll be cataclysmic. one of the scenarios the republicans have is to pay china first. pay china first is in their c.r. pay the debt, whatever we owe china. all things come together in a way that really is not responsible. it is beneath it in the teeth of the responsibility that we have as members of congress and the obligation we have to find common ground to get the job done. people can make whatever scrambles they want to make to showcase the issue, but not with the seriousness of taking down the full faith and credit of the u.s.
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>> i was out in the field a few days ago reporting on this issue of the debt limit talks. i encountered when gentlemen who said the debt limit should be raised, but he was put off by the president refusing to negotiate. do think democrats lose by that stance from the white house saying they will not negotiate on this? americans want to see the congress and white house come together. >> i think the president has negotiated and negotiated. we have taken it to a point where there is no point in talking. we just have to act. i can understand why the gentleman might get that impression. if there is ever a president that talks about a continuing resolution about the c.r., he has in every way try to build
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bipartisan consensus. i do not think he advertises that enough. i'm happy to do that for him. he has a bigger bully pulpit than i do. none of us should be negotiating on the debt ceiling. it should just be listed. when it comes to the c.r., the president has negotiated. remember that march meeting with the president?he sd, i hear wh'e saying. i think you know how i approach all of this. i want to try to get a bipartisan agreement. obviously that has not come. this is a president who has been so bipartisan. that is a quality the american people like. even he has reached the end of
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the line when it comes to the shenanigans that the other side is putting up. what they are proposing is unworthy of the task before us in responsibility. thank you. >> c-span3 will have congressional hearings thursday. doug elmendorf on the long-term budget outlook. he will testify before the house budget committee. intelligence director james clapper and keith alexander will be testifying at the senate intelligence committee. watch both hearings live on c- span three and c-span.org.
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with spending authority set to expire, the house and senate passed their own spending bills. the house version includes a provision that the funds the affordable care act. senate budget committee chairman patty murray criticize the house bill. this is one hour. >> it is hard to get a large audience of mostly women quiet, isn't it? i'm happy about that though. welcome. thank you for being here. my name is elizabeth baker. i'm vice president of "the atlantic." welcome to washington. i also want to welcome the viewers that we have on our live stream, as well as c-span. we are welcome to have a larger audience outside. "the atlantic" covers women and
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family issues and women professional issues in the pages of the magazine with articles like -- on our website, there is a channel that covers a lot of these issues. i thought i would bring your attention to our latest issue, including one i thought particularly interesting as a mother of three, "my daughter's homework is killing me." [laughter] this is about a father who decides to do his daughter's homework. 3-4 hours of homework per night and sleep six and half hours. not necessarily a good thing we're doing for our teens and tweens. we try to bring women's issues to life. this is the fourth program we have had this year so far
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following janet napolitano. we want to shine a spotlight on the careers of some women have done really well in washington to hear the personal stories and hear the career stories as well. we're very pleased to welcome senator patty murray as our guest, who is chairman of the senate budget committee. before i invite patty up to the stage, i want to give a special thank you to exxon mobil. they have been partners on this program since the beginning. we came up with a get together to try to bring together a community of women leaders in washington. exxon mobil has supported the program since offset. our partner terry is vice president and is the leader of the washington office for
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mobile. she joined the firm in 2001. prior to that, deputy assistant at the department of energy. a few housekeeping notes -- we encourage you to be part of the conversation. you can tweet comments. the hash tag is #atlanticww. we will also have an opportunity for q&a at the end. we are taping and live streaming. silencer cell phones please. i'm very happy to introduce senator patty murray. senator murray was born and
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raised in washington. she never imagined a career in politics. she got into it as a mom. she was advocating for one of her children. she miniature to washington and was told she couldn't make a difference. she turned around and made a grassroots organization that indeed made a difference. they were able to reverse cuts. she was selected to the washington state senate. in 1992, she went for the u.s. senate pursues a tenured veteran. she was selected as a senator. she was reelected in 2004 and 2010. in addition of being the first female senator from washington state, she serves as a chair on a committee. serving as a member of the
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senate credit leadership since 2007, she has established herself as an effect if leader on education, transportation, security, and veterans issues. welcome. interviewing her will be karen. she is new to the seat. thank you for doing this. welcome. she has a full-time role at msnbc. it is on air saturdays and sundays. she has had a long career in washington, in politics, working for presidential campaigns and at the white house and and in the new york senate race. she has been a commentator in
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the hill. again, many thanks to karen and senator patty murray. >> thank you. [applause] >> i thought were read would start is the story about the school is one. one of the things that i thought was so remarkable and by wanted to start their is when you look at the hearings this year on military sexual assault, so many women there are asking questions and comparing that to that picture of anita hill being questioned by all of these men. it felt like we have come such a long way.
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>> it is a good place to start. >> absolutely. looking forward to hearing your thoughts and comments as well. i remember it like it was yesterday. i was a state legislator. we were working passionately on issues i cared about. preschool education got me into politics to start with. issues around family and fighting for things that i cared about. i remembered hearing about a nomination back of the nation's capital. the entire nation keyed into what was happening in d.c. i turned on my television to
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watch the united states senate committee interrogate this poor woman named anita hill. i kept looking at this committee. god. all men. not saying but i would say. i felt disoriented. i went to a dinner where everyone was talking about that. i will have to run for the senate. i didn't hear anyone say what i am saying. [laughter] it came from that. i felt passionately that you can sit home and complain about what is going on, but sometimes the only way to change it is to say, ok. i will do it. i went to the senate in 1992.
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no one gave me a chance. i was out 3-1. i was kind of the quotation at the end. no one believed me. no one at the time -- they felt they needed someone who would be their voice. i came in. i came in in the year of the women. it was a change or the country and the responsibility of being part of that. fast forward to the hearings now where every single committee has a woman on it. i can see my voice being reflected time and time again. this is a test i think it's one of the things that has changed our country. >> one thing that is notable is not only that we have 20 women
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senators but women senators in positions of power. >> you have to be here and work your way up the ranks. we have been here long enough to do that. diane feinstein is chair of the intelligence committee. people always say women's issues. intelligence, agriculture. barbara boxer with the it department of environmental works. we are not just a voice, but we are a player, making sure the passions we care about, the priorities we care about, the voice we care about is from the legislation. >> we are going to talk a little bit about the drama.
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everybody has got to have their moment. senator jill a brand -- gillibrand is a friend of mine. sometimes we need to get away from the testosterone and get something done. i wonder if you can talk about how women's leadership has changed the weight wings are working. -- has changed a way things are working. >> we all felt the weight of doing a good job, not for ourselves, but for other women so they would be in politics and do our job. we found we are our best
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supporters and could share things. our team leader brought us together for the first one, and we found this camaraderie to be able to say, where's the dry cleaners, or i'm trying to work on this legislation for women in rwanda, and i don't quite know how to do it, or i have got an issue going at home, and i need to get is done. -- get this done. we were our best supporters. we have continued the tradition for 20 years. we welcomed new women from both parties. we really do go and then talk about everything from somebody's
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new grandchild or where the best place to get fast food is late at night or how we can focus on the budget crisis. we have every one of those discussions. i think it has been helpful for us, and our goal still remains the same. if we can help each other be successful, other women will be able to do the job. >> there is a lot of talk. when you hear stories from back in the day, people knew each other. there was a personal relationship, and it seems like it is the weapon carrying on that tradition. >> you find kids in your school, and you find common ground. we do the same thing.
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>> there is a dinner you had with president obama, which we are curious to hear about. >> it was one of my favorite because he invited 20 women to the white house to have dinner with him. >> it was one of my favorite because he invited 20 women to the white house to have dinner with him. we were looking at the white house lawn, and we shared everything. we talked about finding a solution. we talked about small issues and big issues. sort of towards the end of it barbara boxer said i am looking out the window, and i am thinking 100 years ago when women were fighting for the right to vote they stood out of that window and were arrested the coast they tried to get the
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right to vote. i am pretty sure that 20 women around this table would have been the 20 women protesting. it remind us of what we get so frustrated with the political process that a lot of progress has been made. our country has changed in a lot of ways. we are a country with great change, and we need to embrace that. >> a little bit of drama on the hill. and a non-filibuster to slow down this process, maybe you can tell us where we go from here.
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>> he uses the time available, and that's fine. here's where we are. we all know that finding a solution to our nation's budget was probably the top priority for all of us right now. we go without having any continuity. we wrote our budget last march, passed it in the senate, and normally you would go to a conference committee and work
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out the differences. surprisingly, the minute we did, they objected. everyone is going to be upset, and we will do something that keeps us running. here we are. it really is unfortunate. democrats and republicans have got to sit down at the same table and give. that has to be done, and our nation deserves that.
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>> it strikes me that over the summer we saw this old up, and we had some are republicans -- this buildup, and we had some republicans saying it was never going to happen. now we seem to be at the testosterone filled movement, and it will go back to the house, and there is a ping-pong between house and senate, but you are already hearing about house members having a list of demands for increasing the debt ceiling. how is that going to get us out of this crisis to crisis zone? we are talking about a continuing resolution. we aren't even talking about a budget. >> the house passes a bill that is completely unacceptable.
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we're not going to take away the progress we we have made for providing health care in the country. we are going to take it in the senate. it will be sent as a resolution. i think it's important to remember that we are talking about the government while we keep this issue. this is how we manage ourselves. they decided to make a temper tantrum about that. that's where we are. the debt ceiling, what are we going to do? i cannot believe the republicans would use the debt ceiling to throw our country into economic turmoil when we know we are just getting to feel stable again, when we are all beginning to feel we can go to work and not get a pink slip, that wall street is not going to collapse, and they are going to throw the country into turmoil?
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i cannot believe they are going to do that. the rational thing to do if there were a group of women in charges we would keep the government running for the next several weeks, and we would say, we are going to pay our bills, and let's do what we have to do and pay our debts. that will take the leaders of both parties coming together and giving. which is how democracy works. >> who are the leaders on the republican side who can make that happen? we have seen a lot of frustration with john boehner's ability to negotiate.
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it does seem mitch mcconnell has been less willing to be out there because he is worried he is being primary back in his home state of kentucky. we have all these. who do we negotiate with? >> i think the republican -- the problem is republicans are being controlled more by the tea party part of their group. they really don't want our democracy to function the way it is. harry reid uses the word anarchy. i don't know if i would go that far, but they came here to vote no. how do you function? that is what speaker boehner is dealing with. they believed that
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their party has to stand up to that faction and i grew. i am a democrat. i want democrats to be in the majority. i want the policies that i believe and to be the ones that run the country. in order to be a good country, we need a strong republican party who can negotiate with us and i can sit down with. i will say that i can give on this if you can give on that. we do not have a functioning right now. but i think that as we move forward, we will have a better republican party and we have to. >> so by midnight on sunday. >> you're going to get a continued resolution. i cannot imagine the republicans want the face of their party to be that they cannot come to an agreement on small things. i cannot believe that even with the faction that is hard to deal with a would want that for republicans.
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>> we have seen this idea that perhaps they will try to shift the conversation and get something done there but then really focus on the debt ceiling and the list of demands and other things they are going to insist upon, but shutting down the government is horrible. the debt limit is a very serious threat. >> i think they are making a mistake if they are saying to the american public that they are going to put our entire economy at risk in order to get their projects, even if i agree with some of them. think about the precedent that sets for the rest of our lives.
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every time someone is in the majority or the minority they use the debt ceiling or the economy to get what they want? we cannot run the economy that way. it's one thing if you have defenses about women's right to choose or differences about how much funding should the for education, but to put our entire economy at risk when we are at the global marketplace where other countries are competing for the same thing we are and we look like a third world country that cannot manage itself, i think that's very dangerous. >> does it take leadership from the president to make that happen? >> the president is clear he will not negotiate over the debt ceiling. >> where do we end up if he is
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not willing to negotiate and they aren't willing to budge? >> they are apparently working on christmas tree filled demands to raise the debt ceiling. they haven't been able to get the vote for everything they said they wanted either. what they are saying is i know you will never vote for the debt ceiling, but if i put in a pipeline, will you vote for it? let's wait and see what they get together. we will send it back clean because that is the responsible thing to do. they are going to have to live with their willingness to throw the economy -- i go back to the 1990's, when newt gingrich shut the government down. i got on a plane to go home, and people said, what are you doing here? i went in my office and answered the phone to people in tears who were not going to get their
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social security check. they were not able to pay their rent. if the republicans take us off that cliff and companies lay off people and folks are not getting their social security check, they are going to sit there very long. i don't think they're very smart to put us in that place. they are going to sit there very long. >> what about the business community. it strikes me that the shutdown in the clinton white house it was -- i was nonessential. it strikes me that part of the dynamic was something everybody could understand, but the debt ceiling, for a lot of folks in ohio and pennsylvania, it's a harder conversation and an easier message from the republican side to say we are standing on our principles, and
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we aren't going to raise the debt ceiling. >> i think businesses in america are really concerned house republicans would but our economy into a crisis. first of all, many of them do business overseas. when they lose out because someone says your debt is no longer good or we don't trust you, they are going to lose out to other countries. their business overnight can be flipped by this economic policy. i think businesses are putting a lot of rusher on republicans. -- a lot of pressure on republicans.
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they put themselves in a real bind, so they have to figure out how to get through that. i would hope the business community stands up. the last time we talked about not raising the debt ceiling, our credit was downgraded. >> there is a list of other stuff that needs to be done. we have got syria. there are so many other issues. how do we get through this and focus on those issues? >> everybody here knows the way you get to a budget agreement is that we sit down and hammer it out. i am going to have to say, i will take that back to my caucus
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and get the vote on it. the republicans have to say the same on their side. i will tell you the 12 people on the supercommittee were really good people, and we spent a lot of time walking through details and talking about what we could put on the table. i had the ability to say i can't bring my caucus with me. what i didn't have was the republican chair who could say the same thing. he had to go back to boehner, who went back to the tea party. we need the people in the room who are willing to stand up and be the leaders on the democratic and republican side, to say i am going to make the best eli can for my party, and then i am going to take it back and sell it because that's what our party needs. >> let's talk about the other issues.
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let's hope we get a settlement by midnight on monday. talk about veterans affairs. there has been a lot about the backlog issue, a lot about concern for mental health. that was raised again with the navy yard. talk about that. >> my own father was a veteran. he was injured. seven kids in my family and my mom didn't know the extent of his injuries and what he went through, only that he was a veteran. when i was in college, it happened to be during the vietnam war, and most of my
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friends were protesting. i was trying to get through school, but i was in my senior year and had to pick somewhere to do my internship. i chose the veterans hospital to do it. i am taking an elevator to the seventh floor, going on to a locked ward to work with men and women my age suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder, although that word was not used at the time. this to me was really vivid. i am dealing with these young men and women dealing with mental health aspects of serving our country. i just remember thinking, somebody has to be a voice for those people, never knowing later i would be elected to the united states senate and be there when we have thousands of
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men and women coming home serving not just one term but 4, 5, and six times with the health issues -- with mental health issues and being in a position to fight for them. the country wants to help. it's unlike the vietnam war. i think our country respect these people. i think our country feels that way today. we want to stand up and provide services, but often the stigma of mental health -- you have to be the warrior saying you have challenges -- is not easy, and critically, it is fighting the culture of our military who don't want to accept that mental health is a challenge we have to deal with, so changing the culture of the military, changing the culture of us as a
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country, not saying i feel bad you have eds the, but i'm not going to hire you. that's a bad attitude. it's a complex problem to have the services available and to have us of the country doing everything we can, not just saying thanks but really being there. >> it strikes me that the affordable care act is a place we could change the conversation given that it would provide services and treating it like any other illness. that could be a place where you have republicans fighting against the affordable care act, talking about the need to address mental health issues not
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just for our veterans that when you are looking at things like gun violence. >> mental health the person themselves have to ask for help. but there is somebody to answer the call when somebody asked for help. this young man was not silent about it. the question we have to ask is did we give him the right things? >> do you think we are making progress on military sexual assault? >> i want that to be better. we stood up and held a three- star general.
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i think what's great is we have women in the senate who are not going to say, it's taken care of. i think the military recognizes it, and the military recognizes they need people to come into the military. if we say i don't want my son or daughter serving in the military, we aren't going to be a strong country. the military has to change. this is not a topic where we say ok, we took care of that. >> in terms of the issue of do these get handled in the chain of command, what resources are
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available outside of the chain of command. where do we end up? >> the good he is we are actually about the solution. we are having a really good debate about that. we will figure that out, but the good news is we are having a debate about that. we didn't have a debate 20 years ago. we are saying it is not working. we want to get it right, and i think we will. >> we are going to take questions in a few minutes. let's switch to education. let's start with early childhood education and the president's proposals regarding headstart. where do you see that going? >> i am the only preschool teacher in the united states
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senator here -- united states senate. i know how important it is for our young children to have the ability to be successful, and there is a huge difference between those who have some kind of support in terms of the six feels we need as americans and being able to work in a group, and we have left the hind the vast majority of young kids today. we have left behind many competitors. we have decades of experience, and every country in the world has shown we need to invest in early childhood education, and we have not done it. a teacher told me 80% of her kindergartners come to school on the first day and don't know how
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to turn up page in a book. what were they doing? a lot of parents don't know to read to their kids, and a lot of parents do. we need to give them the skills to say, reading to your children is not just fun. it is important to their brain development. i am 100% behind our country really focusing on those young kids. you know who is with me on this? police chief. they tell me the vast majority of people in their jails never had early education. for me this is a no-brainer that i am passionate about. >> is their support on the republican side of the aisle?
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>> i believe there is. we are looking at the overall budget. what are the priorities? we have spent so much time talking about the deficit that we haven't talked about education. we haven't talked about transportation infrastructure. we also have to deal with these other deficits and get that investment. >> there is talk about increases in military spending. we know that the miniscule amount of waste, fraud, and abuse -- >> you cannot teach a child to come to class hungry. for our young people to be
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participants in the community, you have a group of 24-year- olds, and they have not had something to eat in a couple days, they aren't going to learn anything. i am mad about this. >> there is a level of conversation we have been having. we are talking about $40 million, and we are not talking about investments in early childhood education. how do we shift and find partners on the other side to make those investments happen.
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>> first we give them courage to take on the tea party. there were a lot of republicans who worked with us. they really understood the need for early childhood education. right now those kinds of republican senators are so fearful of being eliminated in a tea party primary all they think they should talk about is how they can cut back. we need to give republicans a way to work with us to lower the cost in our jails when we invest in early childhood education, to have a group that are healthy and well-educated.
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we need to get back to that topic. >> one of your roles has been working to recruit candidates to run in the senate. i wonder why we don't have more women running and what is the argument you make to them to have more run? >> i think it is important we write more policies and repeat back to their constituents what it is. if you have all men creating legislation, women will turn them off. you need women explaining it as well. nordstrom's understands that. i have women and men who are sales people on purpose.
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having diverse body is important. why is it important for women to be in politics? we bring issues to the table, but we help america understand why we are fighting for what we are fighting for. i do think it's important, and it's great to see people. i would tell you i have chaired the democratic committee twice. you don't recruit people into politics. you open the door for them. men the first thing they say is, to money have you raised? they can speak to them. i think they need to know that one enlisted to them while they speak.
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>> a question to the left? >> i want to thank your staff for their interest in looking at how we can capture savings from budget processes, and i am wondering your thoughts on that and how we might move forward. >> that is a huge amount of
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affordable care, refocusing us from paying huge amounts for all the things that cost more. we have got a huge disconnect when we look at it. insurance companies cover you until you are 65. insurance companies have never been interested in doing prevention for those diseases you normally spend a lot of money on after you are 65. it is somebody else's problem. we need to make sure the health care system focuses on prevention. it's what the affordable care act does by providing health care coverage for people so they do have mammograms on a regular
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basis. if you have knowledge and make the decisions about yourself, then you make the decisions about yourself. if you don't have the knowledge, you are going, if i had just eaten more vegetables, or whatever it is. we need to help people do that. a lot of businesses are looking at wellness. >> it's not just having information but having access. there isn't always this understanding that some people don't have the opportunity to make a good choice. >> go back to those kids who come to school and don't know how to turn a page in a book. if they haven't been read to, have they ever had immunizations?
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have they ever had simple care when they were young that helps them be healthier? probably not. we have to make sure we work with those communities and provide them with the knowledge they need. parents want to do the right thing, but it is helping them get the knowledge. >> other questions? >> i work for government services. you mentioned several times congressman boehner and other republicans need to go back to the tea party to get permission to get legislation passed, and i think it has been well established that the tea party is not a grassroots organization at all. it's basically funded by people like charles and david coke.
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how does the senate stop something like the tea party from holding the rest of america hostage? >> i hate to give advice to my republican counterparts, because i want to stay in the majority, and i want to win, but i would say, you need to stand up to the tea party. people will admire that and respect that. people want their legislators to work from a point of courage, not the point of fear. that is were tea party members are winning. if you have republicans that look fearful versus a strong person who says they are going
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to go for it, you will lose, but if you say, i disagree with you, and this is what is important, they are going to start winning. >> i've had private conversations with republicans in this town. there were so many republicans who thought what rush limbaugh said was terrible. i said, why don't you say that? they said, we cannot speak out against rush. similarly, you hear the conversation about tea party people. as much frustration as they have, it deems like a are -- like they are looking at their colleague. >> that's leading from the point of fear.
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people don't support fear. whether you are a ceo or a legislator, they need to be confident in their leaders. if you are confident in your self people will be confident in you. they need to take them on. >> i am peggy. i am a congressional report are for hispanic outlook. i have to cover all sides and all issues. i have met a lot of republican women. very often everyone thinks the same. there are a lot of african american women who don't approve of gay marriage. i am worried about people becoming less tolerant.
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the press is making it hard to work with tea party people. how do you work with them? fax she and i have introduced legislation to gather. i have a tremendous -- together. i have a tremendous amount of respect for her. she was great speaking out. she took on her own leadership. we need to reward that in america and in the press. often that gets lost. >> with the democratic women, there is diversity of opinion. >> i come from a big family. we recognize i will not agree with kelly on certain issues, but we don't have to debate that
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all the time. let's find out what we agree with. i think it's important to say, we have a budget in front of us. what can we do? that's how we come to compromise and how we are willing to do that. i think the reward of encouraging people to do that is what we have lost and needs to
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come back. >> is that a function of how women lead? >> we chair the transportation committee. we both work closely together. i realize there are things she needs i may not agree with, but i am willing to put that in the bill so she has something she can bring forward. we wrote the bill. we were told we would never get it out of subcommittee. i think i may be your only republican vote, and we ended up getting six or seven republican votes, and we brought it to the senate floor only because mitch mcconnell thought we weren't
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going to pass any appropriation bills. susan and i respect each other. she respects what my values are. we know what our common ground is. we know when we disagree. we don't need to focus on our disagreement. often we are moms. we have kids. we know we cannot give them what they want always, but we listen to what we can give them. that is another trade. >> a good experience for working in the senate. >> i want to say thank you for all the leadership you have demonstrated for children with disabilities and our veterans. it has been a joy to work with you on making sure they get what they need. we come from the radical
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position that people need health care to live independent lives. one thing we have been proud of is market reforms, no pre- existing conditions for kids. we think all those things are good for the middle class and families. we are frustrated by 41 or 42 votes in the house. we think that's silly, but what are the implications of all these votes from your perspective? >> we are very clear. if we want to keep government running we are supposed to repeal the affordable care act. are there parts we can make better? of course there is. but are we going to take maternity care for women in this
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country and go back to a place where pre-existing condition is being pregnant and you don't get health care? are we going to go to a place where kids reach their cap by a- year-old and are denied health care? a woman was saying to me -- they were lamenting the health care bills. i didn't have to say anything. a woman stood up and said, i have to tell you, my son is severely disabled. he has never been able to buy insurance because of that. i am getting older. i am so scared. i could not sleep at night, but he can buy insurance. he is going to be ok. don't take that away. i think as more people see that we will get past the temper
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tantrum. they can say it didn't work. >> one more question. this woman on this site? -- side? >> i am the mother of a preschooler. i am really curious. it strikes me how antiquated it is. i have to go to the fields and harvest them, and over the summer inner-city kids are not getting as much food. they are falling further behind. i wonder when we are going to have a conversation about basic fundamentals. let's teach art and things so
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kids have a way to learn and we can do our job. most of us are farmers. i wonder why we have a hard time tweaking a system that is so wrong. >> there are a lot of creative things being done to deal with that. every woman who is a professional and has a child at home has two address that. we need to allow women to choose to do both. we need to allow women who want to stay home to stay home, and we need policies where women who want to focus on a professional
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life are supported by that. that's what we want. making sure our kids are ok is so critical for the nation. we do a better job when we know our kids are ok. when we have to pick them up at noon or we get charged twice as much, those things make a challenge to do our job. let me throw one thing out i am seeing happen as a result of women speaking out, and that is the issue of daycare. it makes our stomach turn. there is a group of educators
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working with daycare folks to give them curriculum so they are actually giving them curriculum that will help them be a better daycare person. i don't care if you have three kids or 20. the daycare providers are ecstatic. they are being told their job is perfect -- important, and here is how you can do it better. helping those people feel they are a critical part of our country and giving them the skills to do it is going to help all of us in this country. there are some great skills. i wish we had done that. >> take you. we are going to close our program. [applause] >> thank you very much. we know you have a lot going it was wonderful for you to share your thoughts and experiences. a very special thanks for supporting. keep an eye on our website for
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news of our other upcoming programs. thanks again, and enjoy the rest of the afternoon. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] hour.
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>> good morning. >> coming up, he does enter talks about cybersecurity. president obama discusses health care with resident clinton. later, the british labour party meter. on the next washington journal, congressman westmoreland of georgia talks about a crc funded health care law.
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shingle blocker of the national journal talks about what is going on on capitol hill. clark of the government executive media group. washington journal is live every morning at 7:00 eastern. >> c-span, we bring the look affairs directly to you. briefings. conferences. offering complete gavel to gavel coverage of the u.s. house as a public service of private industry. we are c-span. created by the cable tv industry. funded by your local cable provider. now, you can watch us in hd. >> the director of the national security agency spoke today about media leaks and how they affect computer security.
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this was part of the summit in washington, d.c. this is just over an hour. >> good morning. if i could have your attention please. good morning, and welcome to the fourth annual cyber security summit. thank you for coming. it's my honor to welcome you today. i am the producer of today's summit. for those of you not familiar, our mission has been to provide serious, independent reforms with world-class experts on cyber security, and i think we could not have stronger and more knowledgeable -- expert today. we have nearly 30 other
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distinguished speakers, and i want to thank each of the speakers for gathering today. let me gather five quick would just ago announcement. first, this is off the record with two exceptions. the first is the panel that will be held later this morning, and our last panel is the cyber innovation panel. in all cases it is nonclassified. second, c-span will be filming today. dr. alexander and michael daniel our keynote.
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first the disclaimer that the presentations are for informational purposes and represent their views rather than the company. we have a full day planned for you. as you can see, it is a packed day. it is a great series of presenters. we will be taking questions from notecards. if you could please write the questions down, we will pick them when the q&a begins. thank you for your help in that regard. at the conclusion we will ask that you take a half-hour break for lunch.
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we have added a reception, so we hope you will stay and join us for the reception from 5:30 until 6:30. this has been a most active year for cybersecurity. there is a list of topics i could spend a good deal of the day discussing. you represent some of the true leaders in this field, and we hope you will be engaging in conversation. the topics range to big data. without further ado, let's move to the opening keynote. for those now joining us on c-
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span, i want to welcome general alexander, our opening keynote. general keith alexander, as you know, is currently commander of u.s. cyber command, director of the national security agency, and chief of the central security service. he is the nsa's longest service director, having held the position since 2005. in 2010, he became commander of cyber command and earned his fourth start. i'm appreciative he has taken the time out of his extremely busy schedule to speak to our audience here and to our c-span audience watching with us. i turn the podium to you with many thanks for agreeing to add your important perspective to the open dialogue during a time of immense challenges in the
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cybersecurity feel that we are trying to address today to help secure our nation. i turn the podium to you and thank you again for being with us. [applause] >> i have a four-hour speech set up. thank you for the warm introduction and thank you for the invitation here. i did have dental surgery. it is not that i was chewing tobacco. it is good to see you here. an old friend, and i use the "old" loosely, we worked together years ago. i was set out on a course. i never wanted to stay in the military. i always thought i would get out after five years.
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tom weinstein talked me into staying in. he probably said, maybe you stayed six months too long. [laughter] the discussion we have today is cybersecurity. i think, upfront, i have to talk about media leaks, not because i want to, not because i went in and had dental surgery to prepare a discussion on media leaks to root canals, but if we are going to have a serious discussion on cybersecurity, we first have to address media leaks. we have to get some of the facts out on the table. i think the first thing we have to have on the table is our
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mission is to defend this country. nsa and cyber command we can do it without your help -- cannot do it without your help. i want to talk to you about that. it is important we put that on the table and that we get people to talk about the facts. not to inflame it, not to sensationalize it. the future of this nation depends on our ability to protect us from terrorist attacks and cyber incidents. those are the two things that can really impact the country. they both significantly operate on the same network. what i will do is walk to -- and then i will shift over to siberia -- cyber security. we need your help and need to get the facts out.
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we need our nation to understand why we need these tools and what the tools mean to civil liberty and privacy and what they mean to defending the country. everyone in this room can remember 9/11. the impact it had on our country. almost 3000 people killed by terrorists. new york and has a mania and here in washington. we remember how the firemen tried to save lives and they themselves were killed. what i most remember, and what i think you in this room really remember is the military picking up that flag.
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we will take it. we will defend the country. and they did. i am proud of that. look at what date petraeus, stan mcchrystal, mick raven, marty, look at what our nation was given to protect the country. they went in for iraq. they went in for afghanistan. a lot of lives were lost. nsa in 2005, some of the folks here are from nsa. they said, we can help here you will help. we will provide the intelligence our troops need to survive and win. we put those folks forward. over 6000 nsa employees went into iraq and afghanistan. dave petraeus said that turned iraq around.
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it shifted it to our favor and put it where it needed to be. dave petraeus said that turned iraq around. it shifted it to our favor and put it where it needed to be. 22 cryptologist have lost their lives in iraq and afghanistan. they are the heroes. not the media leaker. they are the ones that pick the flag up for the folks in new york and he did what our nation needed them to do.

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